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Spatial Mismatch, Immigrant Networks, and Hispanic Employment in the United States

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  • Judith K. Hellerstein
  • Melissa McInerney
  • David Neumark

Abstract

We study the relationship between Hispanic employment and location-specific measures of the distribution of jobs. We find that it is only the local density of jobs held by Hispanics that matters for Hispanic employment, that measures of local job density defined for Hispanic poor English speakers or immigrants are more important, and that the density of jobs held by Hispanic poor English speakers are most important for the employment of these less-skilled Hispanics than for other Hispanics. This evidence is consistent with labor market networks being an important influence on the employment of less-skilled Hispanics, as is evidence from other sources. We also find that in MSAs where the growth rates of the Hispanic immigrant population have been highest, which are also MSAs with historically low Hispanic populations, localized job density for low-skilled jobs is even more important for Hispanic employment than in the full sample. We interpret this evidence as consistent with the importance of labor market networks, as strong labor market networks are likely to have been especially important in inducing Hispanics to migrate, and because of these networks employment in these "new immigrant" cities is especially strongly tied to the local availability of jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Judith K. Hellerstein & Melissa McInerney & David Neumark, 2009. "Spatial Mismatch, Immigrant Networks, and Hispanic Employment in the United States," NBER Working Papers 15398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15398
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    Cited by:

    1. Hellerstein, Judith K. & Kutzbach, Mark J. & Neumark, David, 2014. "Do labor market networks have an important spatial dimension?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 39-58.
    2. Neumark, David & Simpson, Helen, 2015. "Place-Based Policies," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 1197-1287, Elsevier.
    3. Olof Åslund & Lena Hensvik & Oskar Nordström Skans, 2014. "Seeking Similarity: How Immigrants and Natives Manage in the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(3), pages 405-441.
    4. Carlos Gradín & Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2011. "Occupational Segregation by Race and Ethnicity in the US: Differences across States," Working Papers 1102, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
    5. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral Río, 2013. "Occupational segregation in a country of recent mass immigration: evidence from Spain," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(1), pages 109-134, February.
    6. Sarah Bohn & Sarah Pearlman, 2013. "Ethnic Concentration and Bank Use in Immigrant Communities," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 79(4), pages 864-885, April.
    7. Cadena, Brian C., 2014. "Recent immigrants as labor market arbitrageurs: Evidence from the minimum wage," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 1-12.
    8. Janeria Easley, 2018. "Spatial mismatch beyond black and white: Levels and determinants of job access among Asian and Hispanic subpopulations," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 55(8), pages 1800-1820, June.
    9. Krishna Patel & Yevgeniya Savchenko & Francis Vella, 2013. "Occupational sorting of ethnic groups," Chapters, in: Amelie F. Constant & Klaus F. Zimmermann (ed.), International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 12, pages 227-241, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral del Río & Carlos Gradín, 2010. "The extent of occupational segregation in the US: Differences by race, ethnicity, and gender," Working Papers 180, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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