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Occupational Gender Composition and Wages in Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Hansen, Jörgen

    () (Concordia University)

  • Wahlberg, Roger

    (University of Gothenburg)

Abstract

We estimate the relationship between wages and occupational gender segregation in Sweden. Because of high wage equality in Sweden compared to the U.S., we expect a lower wage penalty of job femaleness in Sweden than in the U.S. Our results supports this hypothesis. We also investigate how the unexplained gender wage gap vary across occupations and find that this gap is smallest in male dominated jobs and largest in female dominated jobs. Finally, we investigate whether the female wage-experience profiles are different across occupations. Our results indicate that women have flatter wage-experience profiles in female dominated occupations than in male dominated occupations.

Suggested Citation

  • Hansen, Jörgen & Wahlberg, Roger, 2000. "Occupational Gender Composition and Wages in Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 217, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp217
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kimberly Bayard & Judith Hellerstein & David Neumark & Kenneth Troske, 2003. "New Evidence on Sex Segregation and Sex Differences in Wages from Matched Employee-Employer Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(4), pages 887-922, October.
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    3. Macpherson, David A & Hirsch, Barry T, 1995. "Wages and Gender Composition: Why Do Women's Jobs Pay Less?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(3), pages 426-471, July.
    4. Polachek, Solomon William, 1981. "Occupational Self-Selection: A Human Capital Approach to Sex Differences in Occupational Structure," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(1), pages 60-69, February.
    5. Richard B. Freeman & Lawrence F. Katz, 1995. "Differences and Changes in Wage Structures," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number free95-1.
    6. Dickens, William T & Lang, Kevin, 1985. "A Test of Dual Labor Market Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 792-805, September.
    7. Becker, Gary S, 1985. "Human Capital, Effort, and the Sexual Division of Labor," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 33-58, January.
    8. Miller, Paul W, 1987. "The Wage Effect of the Occupational Segregation of Women in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388), pages 885-896, December.
    9. Solomon William Polachek, 1985. "Occupation Segregation: A Defense of Human Capital Predictions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 20(3), pages 437-440.
    10. Hakim, Catherine, 1998. "Social Change and Innovation in the Labour Market: Evidence from the Census SARs on Occupational Segregation and Labour Mobility, Part-Time Work and Students' Jobs, Homework and Self-Employment," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198293811.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Havet, Nathalie, 2004. "Écarts salariaux et disparités professionnelles entre sexes : développements théoriques et validité empirique," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 80(1), pages 5-39, Mars.
    2. Görlich Dennis & Grip Andries de, 2007. "Human Capital Depreciation during Family-related Career Interruptions in Male and Female Occupations," ROA Research Memorandum 007, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    3. Maude Toussaint-Comeau, 2016. "Mexican immigration, occupational clustering, and the local labor market adjustment of African-American workers," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-31, December.
    4. Etoundi Atenga, Eric Martial & Chameni Nembua, Célestin & Meva Avoulou, Henri Joel, 2013. "Ecarts de salaire entre hommes et femmes au Cameroun : Discrimination ou Capital humain ? Une approche par sous groupes
      [Gender wage gap : Discrimination or Human Capital? A subgroup approach]
      ," MPRA Paper 64761, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Aug 2014.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender wage gap; occupational segregation;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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