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Ecarts de salaire entre hommes et femmes au Cameroun : Discrimination ou Capital humain ? Une approche par sous groupes
[Gender wage gap : Discrimination or Human Capital? A subgroup approach]

Author

Listed:
  • Etoundi Atenga, Eric Martial
  • Chameni Nembua, Célestin
  • Meva Avoulou, Henri Joel

Abstract

The working population is becoming more and more feminized from 2000 to 2008 in Cameroon. Women receive on average a salary lower than that of the men and the sex remains a significant determiner of the professional position in Cameroon. From Oaxaca-Blinder(1973)decomposition, this work suggests studying gender wage gap composition in private and para public sectors by using subgroup approach. Results show that wage gap is estimated to 8.8% in favor of men. This gap is higher for employees aged more than 70 years. Women of this class are more discriminated. Unexplained part is 70%.On the other hand,gap and unexplained part is more and more high for highest wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Etoundi Atenga, Eric Martial & Chameni Nembua, Célestin & Meva Avoulou, Henri Joel, 2013. "Ecarts de salaire entre hommes et femmes au Cameroun : Discrimination ou Capital humain ? Une approche par sous groupes
    [Gender wage gap : Discrimination or Human Capital? A subgroup approach]
    ," MPRA Paper 64761, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Aug 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:64761
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/64761/1/MPRA_paper_64761.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    wage gap decomposition; Human capital; discrimination; quantile regression;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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