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Gender wage differentials and discrimination in the New South Africa


  • Timothy Hinks


Research into discrimination within South Africa (SA) has focused on racial issues, with gender issues being largely ignored. This study aims to estimate gender wage differentials and through decomposition analysis understand the different problems faced by white, black, coloured and Indian/Asian in 1995. It is found that white and Asian females suffer greater gender discrimination than their black and coloured counterparts, which could be a signal to future problems black and coloured females may encounter. The largest gender wage differential is faced by white females, whilst the lowest is encountered by coloured and black females. A possible explanation for this finding is the low (subsistence) wages that the black and coloured population groups command relative to other population groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy Hinks, 2002. "Gender wage differentials and discrimination in the New South Africa," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(16), pages 2043-2052.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:16:p:2043-2052
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840210124991

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    Cited by:

    1. Flatø, Martin & Muttarak, Raya & Pelser, André, 2017. "Women, Weather, and Woes: The Triangular Dynamics of Female-Headed Households, Economic Vulnerability, and Climate Variability in South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 41-62.
    2. Timothy Hinks, 2012. "Fractionalization and well-being: Evidence from a new South African data set," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(3), pages 253-271, December.
    3. Mohamed Jellal & Christophe Nordman & Francois-Charles Wolff, 2008. "Evidence on the glass ceiling effect in France using matched worker-firm data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(24), pages 3233-3250.
    4. Kumar, Neha & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2014. "Gender and resilience:," IFPRI book chapters,in: Fan, Shenggen & Pandya-Lorch, Rajul & Yosef, Sivan (ed.), 2013 Global Food Policy Report, chapter 17 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4377 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Richard U. Agesa & Jacqueline Agesa & Andrew Dabalen, 2013. "Sources of the Persistent Gender Wage Gap along the Unconditional Earnings Distribution: Findings from Kenya," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(1), pages 76-103, March.
    7. Ng, Ying Chu, 2004. "Economic development, human capital, and gender earnings differentials in China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 587-603, December.
    8. Haroon Bhorat & Morné Oosthuizen & Kezia Lilenstein & François Steenkamp, 2017. "Firm-level determinants of earnings in the formal sector of the South African labour market," WIDER Working Paper Series 025, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Etoundi Atenga, Eric Martial & Chameni Nembua, Célestin & Meva Avoulou, Henri Joel, 2013. "Ecarts de salaire entre hommes et femmes au Cameroun : Discrimination ou Capital humain ? Une approche par sous groupes
      [Gender wage gap : Discrimination or Human Capital? A subgroup approach]
      ," MPRA Paper 64761, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Aug 2014.

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