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Computer use and wage differentials: US and foreign born male and female workers

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  • Sarbani Banerjee
  • Rama Parai
  • Amar Parai

Abstract

The dual issues of nationality and on-the-job computer use are introduced into the analysis of gender wage gap in the United States, and some new results are reported. It is shown that, all other things remaining the same, (i) inter-gender wage differentials across different groups based on computer use and/or nationality vary from 23% to 35%; (ii) among computer nonusers, the inter-gender wage differentials are quite high and invariant of the country of birth; and (iii) intra-gender wage gap based on computer use at work is high for both native and foreign born workers, but the intra-gender wage gap based on nationality is low for both users and nonusers of computer at work.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarbani Banerjee & Rama Parai & Amar Parai, 2007. "Computer use and wage differentials: US and foreign born male and female workers," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 409-413.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:14:y:2007:i:6:p:409-413
    DOI: 10.1080/13504850500447307
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2014. "Technological Change and Wages in China: Evidence from Matched Employer–Employee Data," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 123-138, February.
    2. Hsin-Fan Chen & Long-Hwa Chen, 2007. "The role of computer use and English proficiency in gender wage inequality: Taiwanese evidence," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 10(16), pages 1-9.
    3. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:10:y:2007:i:16:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS

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