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Changes in the Appalachian Wage Gap, 1970 to 2000

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  • ROBERT BAUMANN

Abstract

Since at least 1960, Appalachia has had lower wages, employment rates, and educational attainment than the rest of the country. Using a sample from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series Census project, the author identifies factors affecting the wage gap between 1970 and 2000. The author finds that increases in educational attainment in Appalachia are counterbalanced by increasing returns to observable and unobservable skill, the decline of the manufacturing industry, and rising wage dispersion, leaving the wage gap for full-time workers in 2000 at essentially the same levels as 1970. Copyright 2006 Blackwell Publishing.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Baumann, 2006. "Changes in the Appalachian Wage Gap, 1970 to 2000," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(3), pages 416-443.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:37:y:2006:i:3:p:416-443
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alan B. Krueger, 1993. "How Computers Have Changed the Wage Structure: Evidence from Microdata, 1984–1989," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(1), pages 33-60.
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    5. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
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    7. Trejo, Stephen J, 1997. "Why Do Mexican Americans Earn Low Wages?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(6), pages 1235-1268, December.
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    14. repec:fth:prinin:377 is not listed on IDEAS
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    17. Timothy Dunne & Lucia Foster & John Haltiwanger & Kenneth R. Troske, 2004. "Wage and Productivity Dispersion in United States Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(2), pages 397-430, April.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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