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Immigration policy and employment assimilation in the United States

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  • Roberto Pedace
  • Christine DuBois

Abstract

We examine the impact of immigration policy on the employment propensity and assimilation of immigrants using a pooled cross-section of the 1994--2004 Current Population Surveys (CPS). The results are generally consistent with positive immigrant employment assimilation. A Blinder--Oaxaca style decomposition shows that the foreign-born obtain more employment primarily through human capital acquisition and changes in labour market conditions rather than higher returns to observable skills, as sometimes seen in wage studies. In addition, our analysis suggests that immigration policies may influence both labour demand and supply incentives and are associated with structural shifts in the labour market.

Suggested Citation

  • Roberto Pedace & Christine DuBois, 2012. "Immigration policy and employment assimilation in the United States," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(36), pages 4721-4730, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:44:y:2012:i:36:p:4721-4730
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2011.589817
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Monastiriotis, Vassilis & Martelli, Angelo, 2019. "Crisis, adjustment and resilience in the Greek labour market: an unemployment decomposition approach," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100402, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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