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The earnings of male immigrants in England: evidence from the quarterly LFS

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  • Michael Shields
  • Stephen Wheatley Price

Abstract

In this paper we estimate earnings functions for native born and foreign born white and non-white males in the English labour market, using data from the Quarterly Labour Force Survey. We correct for selectivity bias in the employment decision and control for the nonreporting of wage information. Importantly, we separate the returns to schooling and to potential experience received in the country of origin from those obtained after immigration. Our results highlight the importance of distinguishing between native born and foreign born males when investigating the labour market experience of ethnic minorities. Furthermore, the earnings performance amongst white immigrants varies considerably.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 1998. "The earnings of male immigrants in England: evidence from the quarterly LFS," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(9), pages 1157-1168.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:9:p:1157-1168
    DOI: 10.1080/000368498325057
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, "undated". "The Earnings of First and Second Generation Immigrants in England; An Investigation Using the Quarterly Labour Force Survey," Discussion Papers in Economics 96/7, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
    2. James J. Heckman, 1976. "Introduction to "Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 5, number 4"," NBER Chapters, in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 5, number 4, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Schmidt, Christoph M, 1993. "The Earnings Dynamics of Immigrant Labour," CEPR Discussion Papers 763, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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