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The Gender Wage Gap in Four Countries




In a series of studies written during the 1980s, Bob Gregory and his co-authors compared the gender wage gap in Australia with that found in other countries. They found it was not the difference in human capital endowments that explained different gender wage gaps but rather the rewards for these endowments. They concluded that country-specific factors, especially the institutional environment, were important in explaining the gender wage gap. This study updates Gregory's work by comparing the gender wage gap across four countries, Australia, France, Japan and Britain. Our results concord with those of Gregory: institutions are still important in explaining the relative size of the gender wage gap. Copyright © 2006 The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Daly & Xin Meng & Akira Kawaguchi & Karen Mumford, 2006. "The Gender Wage Gap in Four Countries," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(257), pages 165-176, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:82:y:2006:i:257:p:165-176

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Karen Mumford & Peter N. Smith, 2004. "Job Tenure in Britain: Employee Characteristics versus Workplace Effects," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71(281), pages 275-297, May.
    2. Bob Gregory, 1999. "Labour Market Institutions and the Gender Pay Ratio," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(3), pages 273-278.
    3. Altonji, Joseph G. & Blank, Rebecca M., 1999. "Race and gender in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 48, pages 3143-3259 Elsevier.
    4. R. G. Gregory & R. C. Duncan, 1981. "Segmented Labor Market Theories and the Australian Experience of Equal Pay for Women," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 403-428, April.
    5. Xin Meng & Dominique Meurs, 2004. "The gender earnings gap: effects of institutions and firms--a comparative study of French and Australian private firms," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(2), pages 189-208, April.
    6. Karen Mumford & Peter N Smith, "undated". "The Gender Earnings Gap in Britain," Discussion Papers 04/05, Department of Economics, University of York.
    7. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    8. Mark Wooden, 2001. "Industrial Relations Reform in Australia: Causes, Consequences and Prospects," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(3), pages 243-262.
    9. Gregory, R.G. & Daly, A.E., 1990. "Can Economic Theory Explain Why Australian Women Are So Well Paid Relative To Their U.S. Counterparts?," CEPR Discussion Papers 226, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Maria Takahashi & Shingo Takahashi & Thomas Maloney, 2015. "Gender salary and promotion gaps in Japanese academia: Results from science and engineering," Working Papers EMS_2015_02, Research Institute, International University of Japan.
    2. Marie Drolet & Karen Mumford, 2012. "The Gender Pay Gap for Private-Sector Employees in Canada and Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 50(3), pages 529-553, September.
    3. Linz, Susan J. & Semykina, Anastasia, 2008. "How do workers fare during transition? Perceptions of job insecurity among Russian workers, 1995-2004," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 442-458, June.
    4. van der Velde, Lucas & Tyrowicz, Joanna & Siwinska, Joanna, 2015. "Language and (the estimates of) the gender wage gap," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 165-170.
    5. Tindara ADDABBO & Donata Favaro, 2007. "Education and wage differentials by gender in Italy," CHILD Working Papers wp04_07, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    6. Christian Pfeifer, 2014. "The Gender Composition of Establishments' Workforces and Gender Gaps in Wages and Leadership Positions," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82, pages 69-81, December.
    7. repec:kap:iaecre:v:19:y:2013:i:4:p:331-354 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Dorota Witkowska, 2013. "Gender Disparities in the Labor Market in the EU," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 19(4), pages 331-354, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination


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