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Native-immigrant wage differentials in Greece: discrimination and assimilation

  • Chletsos, Michael
  • Roupakias, Stelios

Abstract: This paper applies the Blinder-Oaxaca methodology in order to decompose the average earnings differentials between Greek workers and different groups of immigrants. We use information about 8,429 individuals of which 1,185 are immigrants. The data are drawn from the Greek Labor Force Survey (2009). The main objective is to explore how much of the differential is explained by differences in observed characteristics. We also investigate the effect that assimilation has on the immigrants’ earnings. Our results provide empirical evidence that the part of the wage gap due to differences in the coefficients is largest for immigrants originating from non-EU countries and negative for those immigrants who terminated education in Greece.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/39940/1/MPRA_paper_39940.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 39862.

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Date of creation: 05 Jul 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39862
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  1. Borjas, George J, 1985. "Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 463-89, October.
  2. Helena Skyt Nielsen, 2000. "Wage discrimination in Zambia: an extension of the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(6), pages 405-408.
  3. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, October.
  4. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Nielsen, Helena Skyt & Rosholm, Michael & Smith, Nina & Husted, Leif, 2001. "Qualifications, Discrimination, or Assimilation? An Extended Framework for Analysing Immigrant Wage Gaps," IZA Discussion Papers 365, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Minas Vlassis & Nick Drydakis, 2007. "Ethnic Discrimination in the Greek Labour Market: Occupational Access, Insurance Coverage, and Wage Offers," Working Papers 0715, University of Crete, Department of Economics.
  7. Thomsen, Stephan L. & Gernandt, Johannes & Aldashev, Alisher, 2008. "The Immigrant Wage Gap in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-089, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  8. Oaxaca, Ronald L. & Ransom, Michael R., 1994. "On discrimination and the decomposition of wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 5-21, March.
  9. Guenter Lang, 2000. "Native-Immigrant Wage Differentials in Germany - Assimilation, Discrimination, or Human Capital?," Discussion Paper Series 197, Universitaet Augsburg, Institute for Economics.
  10. Esteban Sanromà & Raúl Ramos & Hipólito Simón, 2009. "Immigrant wages in the Spanish labour market: does the origin of human capital matter?," Working Papers 2009/8, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  11. Kidd, M.P., 1990. "Immigrant Wage Differentials And The Role Of Self- Employment In Australia," Papers 1990-07, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
  12. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  13. Phelps, Edmund S, 1972. "The Statistical Theory of Racism and Sexism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 659-61, September.
  14. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  15. Kee, Peter, 1995. "Native-Immigrant Wage Differentials in the Netherlands: Discrimination?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(2), pages 302-17, April.
  16. Michael Demoussis & N. Giannakopoulos & S. Zografakis, 2010. "Native-immigrant wage differentials and occupational segregation in the Greek labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(8), pages 1015-1027.
  17. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
  18. Becker, Gary S., 1971. "The Economics of Discrimination," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 2, number 9780226041162.
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