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Native-Immigrant Wage Differentials in the Netherlands: Discrimination?

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  • Kee, Peter

Abstract

This article examines the presence of discrimination in wage offers for Antillean, Surinam, Turkish, and Moroccan immigrants in the Netherlands. The empirical findings indicate that discrimination is present against Antilleans and Turks but not against Surinamese and Moroccans. The Antillean treatment disadvantage accounts for 34 percent and the Turkish for 14 percent of the wage gap with natives. Of the differences in observed characteristics, that in experience is most important for Antilleans and Surinamese and that in education for Turks and Moroccans. For all immigrants, the major separate contribution comes from the relatively low number of school years acquired in the Netherlands. Copyright 1995 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Kee, Peter, 1995. "Native-Immigrant Wage Differentials in the Netherlands: Discrimination?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(2), pages 302-317, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:47:y:1995:i:2:p:302-17
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    Cited by:

    1. Audrey Siew Kim LIM & Kam Ki TANG, 2008. "Human Capital Inequality And The Kuznets Curve," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 46(1), pages 26-51.
    2. repec:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:17:p:1732-1736 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Abdurrahman Aydemir & Mikal Skuterud, 2005. "Explaining the deteriorating entry earnings of Canada's immigrant cohorts, 1966 - 2000," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(2), pages 641-672, May.
    4. Derek Hum & Wayne Simpson, 2002. "Analysis of the Performance of Immigrant Wages Using Panel Data," 10th International Conference on Panel Data, Berlin, July 5-6, 2002 C2-1, International Conferences on Panel Data.
    5. Moreno-Galbis, Eva & Tritah, Ahmed, 2016. "The effects of immigration in frictional labor markets: Theory and empirical evidence from EU countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 76-98.
    6. Liu, Pak-Wai & Zhang, Junsen & Chong, Shu-Chuen, 2004. "Occupational segregation and wage differentials between natives and immigrants: evidence from Hong Kong," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 395-413, February.
    7. Aldashev Alisher & Gernandt Johannes & Thomsen Stephan L., 2012. "The Immigrant-Native Wage Gap in Germany," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 232(5), pages 490-517, October.
    8. Elena Vidal-Coso & Pau Miret-Gamundi, 2014. "The labour trajectories of immigrant women in Spain: Are there signs of upward social mobility?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(13), pages 337-380, August.
    9. Michael Chletsos & Stelios Roupakias, 2017. "Native-immigrant wage differentials in Greece: discrimination and assimilation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(17), pages 1732-1736, April.
    10. Audrey Siew Kim Lim & Kam Ki Tang, 2006. "Human inequality, human capital inequality and the Kuznets curve," CAMA Working Papers 2006-08, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    11. Vakulenko, Elena & Leukhin, Roman, 2016. "Whether the foreign workers are discriminated in the Russian labor market?," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 121-142, February.
    12. Abdurrahman Aydemir & Mikal Skuterud, 2004. "Explaining the Deteriorating Entry Earnings of Canada’s Immigrant," Labor and Demography 0409006, EconWPA.
    13. Dustmann, Christian & Glitz, Albrecht, 2011. "Migration and Education," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    14. repec:eee:rujoec:v:3:y:2017:i:1:p:83-100 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. K.K.Tang & Lim, A. S. K, "undated". "Education Inequality, Human Capital Inequality and the Kuznets Curve," MRG Discussion Paper Series 0506, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    16. repec:dau:papers:123456789/7005 is not listed on IDEAS

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