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Job Tenure in Britain: Employee Characteristics Versus Workplace Effects


  • Karen Mumford
  • Peter N Smith


We consider differences in current job tenure of individuals using linked employee and workplace data. This enables us to distinguish between variation in tenure associated with the characteristics of individual employees and those of the workplace in which they work. The various individual characteristics are, as a group, found to be essentially uncorrelated with the workplace effect, however, this is not true for women and non-white employees. We find that the lower tenure associated with membership of these demographic groups is predominantly captured by workplace effects suggesting some degree of labour market segmentation in Britain.

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  • Karen Mumford & Peter N Smith, "undated". "Job Tenure in Britain: Employee Characteristics Versus Workplace Effects," Discussion Papers 04/06, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:04/06

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Karen Mumford & Peter N Smith, "undated". "The Gender Earnings Gap in Britain," Discussion Papers 04/05, Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Bernhard Boockmann & Susanne Steffes, 2010. "Workers, Firms, or Institutions: What Determines Job Duration for Male Employees in Germany?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 64(1), pages 109-127, October.
    3. Almeida-Santos, Filipe & Mumford, Karen A., 2006. "Employee Training, Wage Dispersion and Equality in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 2276, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Almeida-Santos, Filipe & Chzhen, Yekaterina & Mumford, Karen A., 2010. "Employee Training and Wage Dispersion: White and Blue Collar Workers in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 4821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Filipe Almeida-Santos & Karen Mumford, 2005. "Employee Training And Wage Compression In Britain," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 73(3), pages 321-342, June.
    6. Boockmann, Bernhard & Fries, Jan & Göbel, Christian, 2012. "Specific measures for older employees and late career employment," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-059, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. Cornelissen, Thomas & Hübler, Olaf, 2007. "Unobserved Individual and Firm Heterogeneity in Wage and Tenure Functions: Evidence from German Linked Employer-Employee Data," IZA Discussion Papers 2741, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Anne Daly & Xin Meng & Akira Kawaguchi & Karen Mumford, 2006. "The Gender Wage Gap in Four Countries," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(257), pages 165-176, June.
    9. Monojit Chatterji & Karen Mumford, 2007. "Flying High and Laying Low in the Public and Private Sectors: A Comparison of Pay Differentials for Full-Time Male Employees in Britain," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 209, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
    10. Thomas Cornelißen & Olaf Hübler, 2011. "Unobserved Individual and Firm Heterogeneity in Wage and Job‐Duration Functions: Evidence from German Linked Employer–Employee Data," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(4), pages 469-489, November.
    11. Nuno Crespo & Nádia Simões & José Castro Pinto, 2013. "Determinant factors of job quality in Europe," Working Papers Series 2 13-01, ISCTE-IUL, Business Research Unit (BRU-IUL).
    12. Boockmann, Bernhard & Steffes, Susanne, 2005. "Individual and Plant-level Determinants of Job Durations in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 05-89, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    13. R. Aeberhardt & C. Marbot, 2013. "Evolution of Instability on the French Labour Market during the Last Thirty Years," Documents de Travail de la DESE - Working Papers of the DESE g2013-08, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, DESE.
    14. Boockmann, Bernhard & Steffes, Susanne, 2007. "Seniority and Job Stability: A Quantile Regression Approach Using Matched Employer-Employee Data," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-014, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    15. João Ricardo Faria & Gonçalo Monteiro, 2008. "The Tenure Game: Building Up Academic Habits," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 59(3), pages 370-380.
    16. Merkuryeva, Irina S. & Paramonova, Elena N. & Bitina, Julia M. & Gilchenok, Veronika L., 2006. "Economic analysis based on matched employer-employee data: Methodology of data collection and research," Working Papers 805, Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg State University.

    More about this item


    Job tenure; individual; fixed-effects; voice; segmentation;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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