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Gendered careers: women economists in Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Marcella Corsi
  • Carlo D'Ippoliti
  • Giulia Zacchia

Abstract

Recent reforms of the Italian university system introduced a centralized national qualification competition (called ASN), necessary for accessing all academic positions in the country. Following a well-known international trend, the new mechanism is founded on rigid standardized indexes of “scientific productivity” based on bibliometric indicators. In economics, women’s lower success rate (35%) compared to men’s (44%) is often connected to lower productivity. We provide evidence matching all candidates’ CVs with their record of publications on EconLit, showing that women’s typical career profiles, e.g. in terms of type of publications, topics and methods of inquiry, were penalized regardless of scientific productivity. Our work aims not only at documenting, through a large scale natural experiment, the causes of the underrepresentation of women in academia (especially in top positions) and within economics, but also at raising the issue of new incentives and constrains that increasingly push women to uniform their careers and their research interests to those of their men colleagues.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcella Corsi & Carlo D'Ippoliti & Giulia Zacchia, 2017. "Gendered careers: women economists in Italy," Working Papers CEB 17-003, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:sol:wpaper:2013/244040
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Manuel Bagues & Mauro Sylos-Labini & Natalia Zinovyeva, 2017. "Does the Gender Composition of Scientific Committees Matter?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(4), pages 1207-1238, April.
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    3. Daniele Checchi & Simona Cicognani & Nevena Kulic, 2015. "Gender quotas or girls' networks? Towards an understanding of recruitment in the research profession in Italy," FBK-IRVAPP Working Papers 2015-12, Research Institute for the Evaluation of Public Policies (IRVAPP), Bruno Kessler Foundation.
    4. Dimand, Robert W. & Black, Geoffrey & Forget, Evelyn L., 2011. "Women’s Participation in the ASSA Meetings1," OEconomia, Editions NecPlus, vol. 2011(01), pages 33-49, March.
    5. Robert W. Dimand & Mary Ann Dimand & Evelyn L. Forget (ed.), 2000. "A Biographical Dictionary of Women Economists," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 749.
    6. Maria De Paola & Michela Ponzo & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2016. "Are Men Given Priority for Top Jobs? Investigating the Glass Ceiling in the Italian Academia," CSEF Working Papers 428, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    7. Maria De Paola & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2015. "Gender Discrimination and Evaluators’ Gender: Evidence from Italian Academia," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 82(325), pages 162-188, January.
    8. Ann Mari May & Mary G. Mcgarvey & Robert Whaples, 2014. "Are Disagreements Among Male And Female Economists Marginal At Best?: A Survey Of Aea Members And Their Views On Economics And Economic Policy," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(1), pages 111-132, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Karen Mumford & Cristina Sechel, 2017. "Pay, Rank and Job Satisfaction amongst Academic Economists in the UK," Discussion Papers 17/17, Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. repec:psl:moneta:2017:32 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    women economists; research paradigms; Italy;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • B54 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Feminist Economics
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics

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