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Ethnic and Other Minority Representation in UK Academic Economics

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  • Blackaby, David
  • Frank, Jeff

Abstract

Using a survey questionnaire of academic economists in the United Kingdom, we examine the representation of ethnic and other minorities. We find that nearly 12% of UK-employed academic economists are of ethnic minority origin. However, only 1% of the sample are UK-born ethnic minority. Controlling for individual and workplace characteristics, there is no significant ethnic minority effect on academic rank. However, there is a significant negative earnings effect. Further, 4% of ethnic minority economists feel that they have suffered workplace discrimination.

Suggested Citation

  • Blackaby, David & Frank, Jeff, 2000. "Ethnic and Other Minority Representation in UK Academic Economics," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(464), pages 293-311, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:110:y:2000:i:464:p:f293-311
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Burton, Jonathan & Rowlatt, Amanda & Joshi, Heather, 2002. "Royal Economic Society survey on the gender and ethnic balance of academic economics 2000," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-04, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. William J. Moore & Robert J. Newman & Geoffrey K. Turnbull, 2002. "The Experience-Earnings Profile: Productivity-Augmenting or Purely Contractual?," Departmental Working Papers 2002-13, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    3. Karen Mumford & Cristina Sechel, 2017. "Pay, Rank and Job Satisfaction amongst Academic Economists in the UK," Discussion Papers 17/17, Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Sällström, Susanna & Sjogren, Anna, 2002. "Trapped, Delayed and Handicapped," CEPR Discussion Papers 3335, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2002. "Labour as a buffer: do temporary workers suffer?," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-29, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. William J. Moore & Robert J. Newman & M. Dek Terrell, 2002. "Academic Economists' Pay and Productivity: A Tale of Two Countries," Departmental Working Papers 2002-16, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    7. Karen Mumford, "undated". "Royal Economic Society Women’s Committee Survey on the Gender and Ethnic Balance of Academic Economics 2008," Discussion Papers 09/29, Department of Economics, University of York.
    8. Chen, Jihui Susan & Liu, Qihong & Billger, Sherrilyn M., 2012. "Where Do New Ph.D. Economists Go? Evidence from Recent Initial Job Placements," IZA Discussion Papers 6990, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. William Moore & Robert Newman & Geoffrey Turnbull, 2007. "The Experience-Earnings Profile: Productivity-Augmenting or Purely Contractual? Evidence from the UK," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 417-435, July.
    10. Laura C. Blanco & Karen Mumford, "undated". "Royal Economic Society Women’s Committee Survey on the Gender and Ethnic Balance of Academic Economics 2010," Discussion Papers 11/19, Department of Economics, University of York.
    11. Euwals, Rob & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie, 2000. "What Matters Most: Teaching or Research? Empirical Evidence on the Remuneration of British Academics," CEPR Discussion Papers 2628, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Price, Gregory N., 2009. "The problem of the 21st century: Economics faculty and the color line," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 331-343, March.
    13. William J. Moore & Robert J. Newman & Peter J. Sloane & Jeremy D. Steely, 2002. "Productivity Effects of Research Assessment Exercises," Departmental Working Papers 2002-15, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.

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