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Labour as a Buffer: Do Temporary Workers Suffer?

  • Booth, Alison L.

    ()

    (Australian National University)

  • Francesconi, Marco

    ()

    (University of Essex)

  • Frank, Jeff

    ()

    (University of London)

In this paper, we investigate whether or not there is an equal opportunities dimension to regulating equal pay and conditions for temporary work. We develop a “buffer stock” model of temporary work that suggests a number of reasons why ethnic minorities and women may be more likely to be on fixed-term contracts than comparable white males. Using three different British datasets (a random representative survey of households and two data sets of specific labour market groups), we then estimate the degree to which women and/or ethnic minorities are more likely to be on temporary contracts and estimate any associated wage differentials.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp673.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 673.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2002
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Gabriel Fagan, Francesco Paolo Mongelli and Julian Morgan (eds.), Institutions and Wage Formation in the New Europe , Edward Elgar 2003
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp673
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  1. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages F189-F213, June.
  2. Alison L Booth & Juan J. Dolado & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Symposium On Temporary Work Introduction," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages F181-F188, June.
  3. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2003. "A sticky floors model of promotion, pay, and gender," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 295-322, April.
  4. Juan J Dolado & Carlos Garcia--Serrano & Juan F. Jimeno, 2002. "Drawing Lessons From The Boom Of Temporary Jobs In Spain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(721), pages F270-F295, June.
  5. David Blackaby & Alison L Booth & Jeff Frank, 2005. "Outside Offers And The Gender Pay Gap: Empirical Evidence From the UK Academic Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(501), pages F81-F107, 02.
  6. Blackaby, David & Frank, Jeff, 2000. "Ethnic and Other Minority Representation in UK Academic Economics," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(464), pages F293-311, June.
  7. Jeff Frank, 2006. "Gay Glass Ceilings," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(291), pages 485-508, 08.
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