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Temporary employment in Russia: why mostly men?

Author

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  • Tatiana KARABCHUK

    () (Centre for Labor Market Studies, Higher School of Economics, Russian Federation)

Abstract

The paper deals with temporary employment on the Russian labour market. The main focus is the gender differences of determinants for being temporary employed in Russia. The puzzle here is that Russia is completely different from European countries where women are most likely to have temporary work. The general question for the paper is why? The household survey of NOBUS (held in 2003 by State statistical centre with World Bank participation) is used to answer the question. The results of the survey prove that gender differences for the probability of temporary employment do exist and the main factors that explain these differences are education and marital status.

Suggested Citation

  • Tatiana KARABCHUK, 2011. "Temporary employment in Russia: why mostly men?," Scientific Bulletin - Economic Sciences, University of Pitesti, vol. 10(1), pages 42-60.
  • Handle: RePEc:pts:journl:y:2011:i:1:p:42-60
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2002. "Labour as a buffer: do temporary workers suffer?," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-29, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Maia Güell & Barbara Petrongolo, 2000. "Workers Transitions from Temporary to Permanent Employment: the Spanish Case," CEP Discussion Papers dp0438, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 189-213, June.
    4. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2000. "Temporary jobs: who gets them, what are they worth, and do they lead anywhere?," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-13, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Chalmers, J. & Kalb, G., 2000. "Are Casual Jobs a Freeway to Permanent Employment?," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 8/00, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    6. John T. Addison & Paulino Teixeira, 2003. "The Economics of Employment Protection," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 24(1), pages 85-129, January.
    7. Fairlie, Robert W, 1999. "The Absence of the African-American Owned Business: An Analysis of the Dynamics of Self-Employment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(1), pages 80-108, January.
    8. Olivier Blanchard & Augustin Landier, 2001. "The Perverse Effects of Partial Labor Market Reform: Fixed Duration Contracts in France," NBER Working Papers 8219, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Frédéric Salladarré & Stéphane Hlaimi, 2014. "Analysis of the determinants of Temporary employment in 19 European countries," Working Papers hal-00174817, HAL.
    10. V. Gimpel’son & R. Kapelyushnikov., 2006. "Non-standard Employment and the Russian Labor Market," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 1.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karabchuk, Tatiana, 2012. "Informal employment in Russia: Why is it so sustainable?," economic sociology_the european electronic newsletter, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, vol. 13(2), pages 29-36.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    temporary employment; gender; determinants of the probability; decomposition for gender differences;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts

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