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Employment Choices and Pay Differences between Non-Standard and Standard Work in Britain, Germany, Netherlands and Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Siv Gustafsson

    (University of Amsterdam)

  • Eiko Kenjoh

    (University of Amsterdam)

  • Cecile Wetzels

    (TNO/STB)

Abstract

This paper analyses two questions. First, how do otherwise similar people across four countries end up in fourdifferent employment states: 1) full-time with a regular contract, 2) part-time with a regular contract, 3) fixedterm contract full-time or part-time and 4) self-employed? Second, how do wages differ between otherwise similarpeople between work arrangements in each of the four countries in our analysis? We employ the 1998 wave ofhousehold panel data sets namely BHPS for Britain, GSOEP for Germany, OSA for the Netherlands and HUS for Sweden.The reason for analysing and comparing four countries is an interest in policies that may result in differentchoices for otherwise similar people.Our multinomial analyses show that the probability of working part time, both for men and women in the Netherlandsis much higher other things equal than for men and women in the other three countries. Similarly the probabilityof being self employed for men in Sweden is much higher than in the other three countries. In Germany, fixed-termworkers are conspicuously badly paid compared to fixed-term workers in the other three countries. Furthermorewe find part-time workers relatively better paid in Sweden and the Netherlands than in Britain and Germany.

Suggested Citation

  • Siv Gustafsson & Eiko Kenjoh & Cecile Wetzels, 2001. "Employment Choices and Pay Differences between Non-Standard and Standard Work in Britain, Germany, Netherlands and Sweden," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 01-086/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20010086
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rebecca M. Blank & Richard B. Freeman, 1994. "Evaluating the Connection between Social Protection and Economic Flexibility," NBER Chapters, in: Social Protection versus Economic Flexibility: Is There a Trade-Off?, pages 21-42, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. John M. Evans & Douglas C. Lippoldt & Pascal Marianna, 2001. "Trends in Working Hours in OECD Countries," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 45, OECD Publishing.
    3. Danièle Meulders & Siv Gustavsson, 2001. "Gender and the labour market: econometric evidence on obstacles in achieving gender equality," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/7736, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. Siv S. Gustafsson & Shirley Dex & Cécile M. M. P. Wetzels & Jan Dirk Vlasblom, 1996. "Women`s labor force transitions in connection with childbirth: A panel data comparison between Germany, Sweden and Great Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(3), pages 223-246.
    5. Rebecca M. Blank, 1994. "Introduction to "Social Protection versus Economic Flexibility: Is There a Trade-Off?"," NBER Chapters, in: Social Protection versus Economic Flexibility: Is There a Trade-Off?, pages 1-20, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Rebecca M. Blank, 1994. "Social Protection versus Economic Flexibility: Is There a Trade-Off?," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number blan94-1, June.
    7. Siv S. Gustafsson & Eiko Kenjoh & Cécile Wetzels, 2001. "Does Part-Time and Intermittent Work during Early Motherhood Lead to Regular Work Later?: A comparison of Labor Behavior of Mothers with Young Children in Germany, Britain, The Netherlands and Sweden," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 70(1), pages 15-23.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sirpa Weckström, 2015. "Finnish Mothers’ Assessments of the Harmfulness of Childcare at Home on Occupational Careers: A Comparison of Twelve European Countries," Social Sciences, MDPI, vol. 4(4), pages 1-22, November.
    2. Jane Waldfogel & Wendy Sigle-Rushton, 2006. "Motherhood and Women’s Earnings in Anglo-American, Continental European, and Nordic Countries," LIS Working papers 454, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    3. Alan Manning & Barbara Petrongolo, 2005. "The Part-Time Pay Penalty," CEP Discussion Papers dp0679, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Raúl Ramos & Esteban Sanromá & Hipólito Simón, 2014. "Public-Private Sector Wage Differentials by Type of Contract: Evidence from Spain," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 208(1), pages 107-141, March.
    5. Aidis, Ruta & Wetzels, Cécile, 2007. "Self-Employment and Parenthood: Exploring the Impact of Partners, Children and Gender," IZA Discussion Papers 2813, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Matteo PICCHIO, 2006. "Wage Differentials between Temporary and Permanent Workers in Italy," Working Papers 257, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    7. Francisco J. GRACIA & José RAMOS & José María PEIRÓ & Amparo CABALLER & Beatriz SORA, 2011. "Job attitudes, behaviours and well-being among different types of temporary workers in Europe and Israel," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 150(3-4), pages 235-254, December.
    8. Tatiana Karabchuk, 2012. "Part-time and temporary workers in Russia: winners or losers? [Teilzeitbeschäftigte und befristet Beschäftigte in Russland: Gewinner oder Verlierer?]," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 45(1), pages 23-39, March.
    9. Wolf, Elke, 2013. "The German part-time wage gap: bad news for men," VfS Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79969, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Elke Wolf, 2014. "The German Part-Time Wage Gap: Bad News for Men," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 663, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    11. Tatiana Karabchuk, 2012. "Temporary employment in Russia: why mostly men?," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 9(2), pages 279-303, August.
    12. Raúl Ramos & Esteban Sanromá & Hipólito Simón, 2014. "Public-Private Sector Wage Differentials by Type of Contract: Evidence from Spain," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 208(1), pages 107-141, March.
    13. Tatiana KARABCHUK, 2011. "Temporary employment in Russia: why mostly men?," Scientific Bulletin - Economic Sciences, University of Pitesti, vol. 10(1), pages 42-60.

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