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Fly Me to the Moon: The Determinants of Secondary Jobholding in Germany and the UK

Author

Listed:
  • Heineck, Guido

    () (University of Bamberg)

  • Schwarze, Johannes

    (University of Bamberg)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the determinants of secondary jobholding in Germany and the UK. Although differing in labor market regulations, moonlighting is a persistent phenomenon in both countries. Using panel data from the BHPS and the SOEP, reduced form participation equations are estimated for male and female workers separately. While the results vary across gender and countries, there is support for both main theoretical strands, i.e. the ‘hours-constraints’ motive as well as the ‘heterogeneous-jobs’ motive. In particular, there is evidence that particularly German workers who would like to work more hours are more likely to have a second job. On the other hand, the prospect of starting a new job is associated with moonlighting behavior of mainly British workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Heineck, Guido & Schwarze, Johannes, 2004. "Fly Me to the Moon: The Determinants of Secondary Jobholding in Germany and the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 1358, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1358
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. René Böheim & Mark P. Taylor, 2004. "Actual and Preferred Working Hours," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 42(1), pages 149-166, March.
    2. Paxson, Christina H & Sicherman, Nachum, 1996. "The Dynamics of Dual Job Holding and Job Mobility," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(3), pages 357-393, July.
    3. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2002. "Labour as a buffer: do temporary workers suffer?," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-29, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Bell, David & Hart, Robert A & Wright, Robert E, 1997. "Multiple Job Holding as a 'Hedge' Against Unemployment," CEPR Discussion Papers 1626, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 189-213, June.
    6. Johannes Schwarze & Guido Heineck, 1999. "Rückgang der Nebenerwerbstätigkeit durch Einführung der Sozialversicherungspflicht wird überschätzt," DIW Wochenbericht, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 66(37), pages 661-666.
    7. Smith Conway, Karen & Kimmel, Jean, 1998. "Male labor supply estimates and the decision to moonlight," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 135-166, June.
    8. Puhani, Patrick A, 2000. " The Heckman Correction for Sample Selection and Its Critique," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(1), pages 53-68, February.
    9. Manski, C.F., 1990. "The Selection Problem," Working papers 90-12, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    10. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    11. Johannes Schwarze & Guido Heineck, 2001. "Auswirkungen der Einführung der Sozialversicherungspflicht für geringfügige Beschäftigung: eine Evaluation des "630-DM-Jobs"-Reformgesetzes," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 257, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    12. Susan Averett, 2001. "Moonlighting: multiple motives and gender differences," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(11), pages 1391-1410.
    13. Krishnan, Pramila, 1990. "The Economics of Moonlighting: A Double Self-Selection Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 361-367, May.
    14. W. David Allen, 1998. "The moonlighting decision of unmarried men and women: Family and labor market influences," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 26(2), pages 190-205, June.
    15. Mark L. Bryan, 2007. "Free to choose? Differences in the hours determination of constrained and unconstrained workers," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(2), pages 226-252, April.
    16. Jürgen Schupp & Johannes Schwarze & Gert G. Wagner, 1997. "Erwerbsstatistik unterschätzt Beschäftigung um 2 Millionen Personen," DIW Wochenbericht, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 64(38), pages 689-696.
    17. Shishko, Robert & Rostker, Bernard, 1976. "The Economics of Multiple Job Holding," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(3), pages 298-308, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Kimmel, Jean, 2005. "Moonlighting Behavior over the Business Cycle," IZA Discussion Papers 1671, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Panos, Georgios & Zangelidis, Alexandros, 2009. "The Inter-Related Dynamics of Dual Job Holding, Human Capital and Occupational Choice," MPRA Paper 16859, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Robinson, Helen & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 2006. "The Impact of the Minimum Wage on the Incidence of Second Job Holding in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 2445, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Zhongmin Wu & Mark Baimbridge & Yu Zhu, 2009. "Multiple job holding in the United Kingdom: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(21), pages 2751-2766.
    5. Dickey, Heather & Watson, Verity & Zangelidis, Alexandros, 2009. "What triggers multiple job holding? An experimental investigation," MPRA Paper 17575, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fixed effects logit estimator; secondary jobholding; labor supply; Germany; UK;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J29 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Other

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