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Multiple job holding in the United Kingdom: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey

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  • Zhongmin Wu
  • Mark Baimbridge
  • Yu Zhu

Abstract

This article examines the determinants of multiple job holding in the UK. We address these issues using data from the first 11 waves of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), which covered the period from 1991 to 2001. Evidence from the BHPS does not support the hypotheses of main job hours constrained and main job insecurity. We argue that the incentive for moonlighting in the UK is due to financial pressures and the desire for heterogeneous jobs. The empirical work is carried out separately for men and women.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhongmin Wu & Mark Baimbridge & Yu Zhu, 2009. "Multiple job holding in the United Kingdom: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(21), pages 2751-2766.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:21:p:2751-2766
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840701335520
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bell, David & Hart, Robert A & Wright, Robert E, 1997. "Multiple Job Holding as a 'Hedge' Against Unemployment," CEPR Discussion Papers 1626, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Mark C. Foley, 1997. "Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition," Working Papers 781, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    3. Heineck, Guido & Schwarze, Johannes, 2004. "Fly Me to the Moon: The Determinants of Secondary Jobholding in Germany and the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 1358, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Smith Conway, Karen & Kimmel, Jean, 1998. "Male labor supply estimates and the decision to moonlight," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 135-166, June.
    5. Foley, M.C., 1997. "Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition," Papers 781, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
    6. Foley, Mark C., 1997. "Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition," Center Discussion Papers 28453, Yale University, Economic Growth Center.
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    Cited by:

    1. Schulz, Matthias & Urbig, Diemo & Procher, Vivien, 2017. "The role of hybrid entrepreneurship in explaining multiple job holders’ earnings structure," Journal of Business Venturing Insights, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 9-14.
    2. Stef Bouwhuis & Goedele A Geuskens & Cécile R L Boot & Allard J van der Beek & Paulien M Bongers, 2019. "Health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands: A cross-sectional study among Dutch workers," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(9), pages 1-14, September.
    3. Conen, Wieteke, 2020. "Multiple jobholding in Europe: Structure and dynamics," WSI Studies 20, The Institute of Economic and Social Research (WSI), Hans Böckler Foundation.
    4. Chung Choe & Ronald L. Oaxaca & Francesco Renna, 2018. "Constrained vs unconstrained labor supply: the economics of dual job holding," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(4), pages 1279-1319, October.
    5. Heather Dickey & Verity Watson & Alexandros Zangelidis, 2011. "Is it all about money? An examination of the motives behind moonlighting," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(26), pages 3767-3774.
    6. Alison Preston & Robert E. Wright, 2020. "Exploring the gender difference in multiple job holding," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(4), pages 301-328, July.
    7. Jan Erik Askildsen & Tor Helge Holmås, 2013. "Wages and work conditions as determinants for physicians’ work decisions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 397-406, January.
    8. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Panos, Georgios & Zangelidis, Alexandros, 2009. "The Inter-Related Dynamics of Dual Job Holding, Human Capital and Occupational Choice," MPRA Paper 16859, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Sabine Raeder, 2018. "Psychological Contracts of Multiple Jobholders: A Multilevel Analysis," SAGE Open, , vol. 8(2), pages 21582440187, May.
    10. Konstantinos Pouliakas, 2017. "Multiple job-holding: Career pathway or dire straits?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 356-356, May.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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