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Russia's second shift: Is housework hurting women's wages?

  • Stephen Deloach
  • Annie Hoffman

Though the USSR officially touted equal opportunity for women, women in Russia earned only 70 percent of men's wages. The combination of women's dual roles in society and inadequate investment by the Soviets in household time-saving devices are often cited as reasons for a lack of commitment and advancement in the labor market. With the recent transition towards a market economy, there is reason to think these effects may be changing. As women become increasingly freer to substitute between formal-sector and household work, the relative importance of commitment in explaining the gender-wage disparity may have diminished. Using data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, this study hopes to shed light on whether differences in time allocated towards household production are capable of affecting wages. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2002

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Article provided by International Atlantic Economic Society in its journal Atlantic Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 30 (2002)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 422-432

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Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:30:y:2002:i:4:p:422-432
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  1. Foley, M.C., 1997. "Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition," Papers 781, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  2. Newell, Andrew & Reilly, Barry, 1996. "The gender wage gap in Russia: Some empirical evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 337-356, October.
  3. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  4. Linz, S.J., 1993. "Gender Differences in the Russian Labour Market," Papers 9208, Michigan State - Econometrics and Economic Theory.
  5. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 1998. "Winners and Losers in Russia's Economic Transition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1094-1116, December.
  6. Mark C. Foley, 1997. "Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition," Working Papers 781, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  7. Constantin G. Ogloblin, 1999. "The Gender Earnings Differential in the Russian Transition Economy," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(4), pages 602-627, July.
  8. Constantin G. Ogloblin, 1999. "The Gender earnings differential in the Russian transition economy," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(4), pages 602-627, July.
  9. Hersch, Joni, 1991. "The Impact of Nonmarket Work on Market Wages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 157-60, May.
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