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Russia's second shift: Is housework hurting women's wages?


  • Stephen Deloach
  • Annie Hoffman


Though the USSR officially touted equal opportunity for women, women in Russia earned only 70 percent of men's wages. The combination of women's dual roles in society and inadequate investment by the Soviets in household time-saving devices are often cited as reasons for a lack of commitment and advancement in the labor market. With the recent transition towards a market economy, there is reason to think these effects may be changing. As women become increasingly freer to substitute between formal-sector and household work, the relative importance of commitment in explaining the gender-wage disparity may have diminished. Using data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, this study hopes to shed light on whether differences in time allocated towards household production are capable of affecting wages. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2002

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Deloach & Annie Hoffman, 2002. "Russia's second shift: Is housework hurting women's wages?," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 30(4), pages 422-432, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:30:y:2002:i:4:p:422-432
    DOI: 10.1007/BF02298785

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Constantin G. Ogloblin, 1999. "The Gender Earnings Differential in the Russian Transition Economy," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(4), pages 602-627, July.
    2. repec:mes:jeciss:v:30:y:1996:i:1:p:161-185 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Newell, Andrew & Reilly, Barry, 1996. "The gender wage gap in Russia: Some empirical evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 337-356, October.
    4. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 1998. "Winners and Losers in Russia's Economic Transition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1094-1116, December.
    5. Foley, M.C., 1997. "Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition," Papers 781, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
    6. Mark C. Foley, 1997. "Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition," Working Papers 781, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    7. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    8. Linz, S.J., 1993. "Gender Differences in the Russian Labour Market," Papers 9208, Michigan State - Econometrics and Economic Theory.
    9. Hersch, Joni, 1991. "The Impact of Nonmarket Work on Market Wages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 157-160, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. J. Ignacio Giménez-Nadal & Lucia Mangiavacchi & Luca Piccoli, 2016. "Mobility across generations of the gender distribution of housework," DEA Working Papers 80, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Departament d'Economía Aplicada.
    2. Linz, Susan J. & Semykina, Anastasia, 2008. "Attitudes and performance: An analysis of Russian workers," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 694-717, April.
    3. Linz, Susan J. & Semykina, Anastasia, 2010. "Perceptions of economic insecurity: Evidence from Russia," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 357-385, December.
    4. repec:sbe:breart:v:32:y:2012:i:1:a:7451 is not listed on IDEAS

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