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The Gender Earnings Differential in Russia After a Decade of Economic Transition

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  • Oglobin, C.

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Abstract

The gender earnings differential in Russia 2000-02 is examined using a nationally representative household survey. Adjusted for hours worked, women’s monthly earnings are 62% of men’s, and women’s long-run effective wage is 69% of men’s. While women’s higher human capital endowments reduce the gender earnings differential, job segregation by gender accounts for about three quarters of it. Wage arrears compress earnings actually received and slightly reduce the gender pay gap. The unexplained part of the differential is largely attributed to discrimination against women.

Suggested Citation

  • Oglobin, C., 2005. "The Gender Earnings Differential in Russia After a Decade of Economic Transition," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(3).
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:aeinde:v:5:y:2005:i:3_1
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    File URL: http://www.usc.es/economet/reviews/aeid531.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    11. Oglobin, C., 2005. "The Sectoral Distribution of Employment and Job Segregation by Gender in Russia," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(2).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Constantin Ogloblin & Gregory Brock, 2006. "Wage Determination in Rural Russia: A Stochastic Frontier Model," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3), pages 315-326.
    2. Dasgupta, Sukti. & Bhula-or, Ruttiya. & Fakthong, Tiraphap., 2015. "Earnings differentials between formal and informal employment in Thailand," ILO Working Papers 994896403402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Andrén, Daniela & Andrén, Thomas, 2007. "Occupational Gender Composition and Wages in Romania: From Planned Equality to Market Inequality?," IZA Discussion Papers 3152, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Anastasia Klimova & Russell Ross, 2012. "Gender-based occupational segregation in Russia: an empirical study," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(7), pages 474-489, June.
    5. Oglobin, C., 2005. "The Sectoral Distribution of Employment and Job Segregation by Gender in Russia," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(2).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; Russia; transition; wages;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies

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