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The Sectoral Distribution of Employment and Job Segregation by Gender in Russia

  • Oglobin, C.

    ()

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    The gender patterns of industrial, occupational, and firm-type distribution of employment in Russia 2000-02 are examined using a nationally representative household survey. After a decade of reforms, the degree of gender job segregation remains high. Women gravitate to lower paid industries and occupations, while men concentrate in more highly paid sectors of the economy. The attitudes and stereotypes resulting from the patriarchal social and cultural legacy play an important role in determining the patterns of gender job segregation by influencing both employers’ preferences and workers’ choices.

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    File URL: http://www.usc.es/economet/reviews/eers521.pdf
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    Article provided by Euro-American Association of Economic Development in its journal Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies.

    Volume (Year): 5 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:eaa:eerese:v:5:y2005:i:5_7
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    1. Blau, Francine D & Kahn, Lawrence M, 1996. "Wage Structure and Gender Earnings Differentials: An International Comparison," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(250), pages S29-62, Suppl..
    2. Hartmut Lehmann & Jonathan Wadsworth & Alessandro Acquisti, 1999. "Grime and Punishment: Job Insecurity and Wage Arrears in the Russian Federation," CERT Discussion Papers 9907, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
    3. John S. Earle & Klara Z. Sabirianova, 2002. "How Late to Pay? Understanding Wage Arrears in Russia," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 02-77, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Constantin G. Ogloblin, 1999. "The Gender earnings differential in the Russian transition economy," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(4), pages 602-627, July.
    5. Gunderson, Morley, 1989. "Male-Female Wage Differentials and Policy Responses," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 27(1), pages 46-72, March.
    6. Standing, Guy, 1994. "The changing position of women in Russian industry: Prospects of marginalization," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 271-283, February.
    7. Oglobin, C., 2005. "The Gender Earnings Differential in Russia After a Decade of Economic Transition," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(3).
    8. Randall K. Filer, 1985. "Male-female wage differences: The importance of compensating differentials," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 38(3), pages 426-437, April.
    9. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan & Acquisti, Alessandro, 1999. "Grime and Punishment: Insecurity and Wage Arrears in the Russian Federation," IZA Discussion Papers 65, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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