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Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition

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  • Foley, Mark C.

Abstract

This article analyzes multiple job holding in the context of economic transition. Evidence from a nationally representative longitudinal survey of Russian citizens is used to characterize secondary jobs and second job holders, with emphasis on the determinants of multiple job holding. There has been a marked increase in multiple job holding, rising from 5.6 percent overall in 1992 to 10.1 percent in 1996. Economic conditions prevalent in Russia's labor market are found to strongly affect secondary job activity. Workers who have experienced wage arrears, been placed on involuntary leave, or are working less than full-time are all significantly more likely to take on second jobs. Higher education nearly doubles this probability. As transition has progressed, women have become not only much less likely to engage in additional work, but those that do so receive significantly lower second-job wages, with a gender wage gap of 68 percent, over 3 times that for primary jobs. Marriage and young children are associated with lower multiple job holding rates for women.

Suggested Citation

  • Foley, Mark C., 1997. "Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition," Center Discussion Papers 28453, Yale University, Economic Growth Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:yaleeg:28453
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.28453
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paxson, Christina H & Sicherman, Nachum, 1996. "The Dynamics of Dual Job Holding and Job Mobility," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(3), pages 357-393, July.
    2. Unni, J., 1992. "Occupational Choice and Multiple Job Holding in Rural Gujarat, India," Papers 677, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ekaterina Kalugina & Catherine Sofer & Natalia Radtchenko, 2009. "Intra-household inequality in transitional Russia," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 447-471, December.
    2. Ekaterina Kalugina & Catherine Sofer & Natalia Radtchenko, 2009. "Intra-household inequality in transitional Russia," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 447-471, December.
    3. Zhongmin Wu & Mark Baimbridge & Yu Zhu, 2009. "Multiple job holding in the United Kingdom: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(21), pages 2751-2766.
    4. Irina Merkuryeva, 2006. "Informal Employment in Russia: Combining Disadvantages and Opportunities," CERT Discussion Papers 0606, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
    5. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan & Acquisti, Alessandro, 1999. "Grime and Punishment: Job Insecurity and Wage Arrears in the Russian Federation," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 595-617, December.
    6. Alessandra Guariglia & Byung‐Yeon Kim, 2006. "The dynamics of moonlighting in Russia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 14(1), pages 1-45, March.
    7. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan & Acquisti, Alessandro, 1999. "Grime and Punishment: Insecurity and Wage Arrears in the Russian Federation," IZA Discussion Papers 65, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Baah-Boateng, William & Adjei, Prince & Oduro, Abena, 2013. "Determinants of moonlighting in Ghana: an empirical investigation," MPRA Paper 109702, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Jaroslava Hlouskova & Panagiotis Tsigaris & Anetta Caplanova & Rudolf Sivak, 2017. "A behavioral portfolio approach to multiple job holdings," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 669-689, June.
    10. Chung Choe & Ronald L. Oaxaca & Francesco Renna, 2018. "Constrained vs unconstrained labor supply: the economics of dual job holding," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(4), pages 1279-1319, October.
    11. Stephen Deloach & Annie Hoffman, 2002. "Russia's second shift: Is housework hurting women's wages?," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 30(4), pages 422-432, December.

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