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Training in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Arulampalam, Wiji

    (University of Warwick)

  • Booth, Alison L.

    (Australian National University)

  • Bryan, Mark L.

    (University of Sheffield)

Abstract

Using the European Community Household Panel, we investigate gender differences in training participation over the period 1994-1999. We focus on ‘lifelong learning’, fixed-term contracts, part-time versus full-time work, public/private sector affiliation, educational attainment, and the individual’s position in the wage distribution prior to training. Women are typically no less likely than men to train. While there is no significant training-age profile for women, there is a negative profile for men. In several countries there is a negative association between fixed-term contacts and training, particularly for men. In most countries and, for both sexes, training is positively associated with public sector employment, high educational attainment and a high position in the wage distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L. & Bryan, Mark L., 2003. "Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 933, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp933
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. L. Bryan, Mark & L. Booth, Alison & Arulampalam, Wiji, 2003. "Training in Europe," ISER Working Paper Series 2003-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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    6. Bassanini, Andrea & Brunello, Giorgio, 2003. "Is Training More Frequent When Wage Compression is Higher? Evidence from the European Community Household Panel," IZA Discussion Papers 839, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    work-related training; gender; fixed term contracts;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J40 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - General

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