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Women in Economics: A UK Perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Gamage, Danula K.

    (Queen Mary, University of London)

  • Sevilla, Almudena

    (London School of Economics)

  • Smith, Sarah

    (University of Bristol)

Abstract

The status of women in economics in the US has come increasingly under the spotlight. We exploit high quality administrative data to paint the first comprehensive picture of the status of women in UK academic economics departments in research-intensive universities. Our evidence indicates that, as in the US, women in economics are under-represented and are paid less than men. The issues facing women in economics in the UK are similar to other disciplines particularly STEM but have received less national policy attention to date. We conclude with a discussion of interventions that might improve the status of women in academia and we present new evidence that a UK academic diversity programme (Athena Swan) has narrowed the gender pay gap at a senior level.

Suggested Citation

  • Gamage, Danula K. & Sevilla, Almudena & Smith, Sarah, 2020. "Women in Economics: A UK Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 13477, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp13477
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Harris, Richard & Maté-Sánchez-Val, Mariluz, 2022. "Gender pay and productivity in UK universities: Evidence from research-intensive Business Schools," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 218(C).
    2. Gamage, Danula K. & Kavetsos, Georgios & Mallick, Sushanta & Sevilla, Almudena, 2020. "Pay Transparency Initiative and Gender Pay Gap: Evidence from Research-Intensive Universities in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 13635, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; affirmative action; academia; women in economics; gender wage gap;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics

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