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Family Ruptures, Stress, and the Mental Health of the Next Generation: Reply

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  • Petra Persson
  • Maya Rossin-Slater

Abstract

Persson and Rossin-Slater (2018) find that prenatal exposure to family ruptures affects childhood and adult mental health, as well as infant physical health. We compare children whose relatives die within 280 days post-conception to children whose relatives die in the year after birth. Matsumoto correctly notes that defining the control group using actual birth dates can bias our estimates. Here, we redefine our control group using expected birth dates. The effects on mental health in childhood and adulthood are statistically indistinguishable from those in our original paper. The infant health impacts are attenuated, but statistically significant in our main specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Petra Persson & Maya Rossin-Slater, 2018. "Family Ruptures, Stress, and the Mental Health of the Next Generation: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 108(4-5), pages 1256-1263, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:108:y:2018:i:4-5:p:1256-63
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.20161605
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jhecon:v:58:y:2018:i:c:p:253-268 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Singhal Saurabh, 2018. "Early life shocks and mental health: The long-term effect of war in Vietnam," WIDER Working Paper Series 65, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Clark, Andrew E. & D'Ambrosio, Conchita & Barazzetta, Marta, "undated". "Childhood Circumstances and Young Adulthood Outcomes: The Role of Mothers’ Financial Problems," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1902, CEPREMAP.
    4. Conti, Gabriella & Mason, Giacomo & Poupakis, Stavros, 2019. "Developmental Origins of Health Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 12448, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Caroline Chuard, 2018. "Womb at work: the missing impact of maternal employment on newborn health," ECON - Working Papers 301, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    6. Janet Currie & Michael Mueller-Smith & Maya Rossin-Slater, 2018. "Violence while in Utero: The Impact of Assaults During Pregnancy on Birth Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 24802, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Terhi Maczulskij & Petri Böckerman, 2019. "Harsh times: do stressors lead to labor market losses?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 20(3), pages 357-373, April.
    8. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2018. "Parental leave benefits, household labor supply, and children's long-run outcomes," IFS Working Papers W18/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    9. Stephanie von Hinke & Nigel Rice & Emma Tominey, 2019. "Mental Health around Pregnancy and Child Development from Early Childhood to Adolescence," Working Papers 2019-048, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    10. Stephanie von Hinke & Nigel Rice & Emma Tominey, 2019. "Mental Health around Pregnancy and Child Development from Early Childhood to Adolescence," Working Papers 2019-048, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    11. De Cao, Elisabetta & McCormick, Barry & Nicodemo, Catia, 2019. "Does Unemployment Worsen Babies' Health? A Tale of Siblings, Maternal Behaviour and Selection," IZA Discussion Papers 12568, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. repec:eee:jhecon:v:62:y:2018:i:c:p:13-44 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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