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Long term effects of childhood asthma on adult health

Listed author(s):
  • Fletcher, Jason M.
  • Green, Jeremy C.
  • Neidell, Matthew J.

Childhood asthma is a major chronic condition affecting millions of children in this country, yet little is known about its potential long term consequences. In this paper, we estimate the relationship between childhood asthma and several outcomes as a young adult. To overcome many of the methodological issues plaguing earlier research on this topic, we estimate sibling fixed effect models that correct for measurement error using parental reports of asthma status. In our preferred specification, we find substantial long term impacts of childhood asthma on general health status, obesity, and missed work and school days as a young adult. Broadly, our findings contribute to the growing literature in social sciences on the impacts of early life health conditions on later life health and social outcomes and suggest early treatment of asthma may have long-run benefits on young adult health and socioeconomic outcomes.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167-6296(10)00048-2
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 29 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 377-387

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:29:y:2010:i:3:p:377-387
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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  1. Chen, Donna & Kreider, Brent & Merwin, Elizabeth & Stern, Steven, 2003. "Diagnosis Measurement Error and Corrected Instrumental Variables," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10231, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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