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The effects of maternal employment on the health of school-age children

  • Morrill, Melinda Sandler
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    The effects of maternal employment on children's health are theoretically ambiguous and challenging to identify. There are trade-offs between income and time, and a mother's decision to work reflects, in part, her children's health and her underlying preferences. I utilize exogenous variation in each child's youngest sibling's eligibility for kindergarten as an instrument. Using the restricted-access National Health Interview Survey (1985-2004), I identify the effects on overnight hospitalizations, asthma episodes, and injuries/poisonings for children ages 7-17. Maternal employment increases the probability of each adverse health event by nearly 200 percent. These effects are robust and do not reflect a non-representative local effect.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V8K-520M1PV-1/2/2fe6122890073cd286932affb93e76b0
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (March)
    Pages: 240-257

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:2:p:240-257
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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