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The long-run effects of attending an elite school: evidence from the UK

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  • Clark, Damon
  • Del Bono, Emilia

Abstract

This paper estimates the impact of elite school attendance on long- run outcomes including completed education, income and fertility. Our data consists of individuals born in the 1950s and educated in a UK district that assigned students to either elite or non-elite secondary schools. Using instrumental variables methods that exploit the school assignment formula, we find that elite school attendance had large impacts on completed education. For women, we find that elite school attendance generated large improvements in labor market outcomes and significant decreases in fertility; for men, we find no elite school impacts on any of these later-life outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Clark, Damon & Del Bono, Emilia, 2014. "The long-run effects of attending an elite school: evidence from the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2014-05
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bri:cmpowp:13/323 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mark Hoekstra & Pierre Mouganie & Yaojing Wang, 2016. "Peer Quality and the Academic Benefits to Attending Better Schools," NBER Working Papers 22337, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Burgess, Simon & Dickson, Matt & Macmillan, Lindsey, 2014. "Selective Schooling Systems Increase Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 8505, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Burgess, Simon, 2016. "Human Capital and Education: The State of the Art in the Economics of Education," IZA Discussion Papers 9885, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Hart, Robert A & Moro, Mirko & Roberts, J Elizabeth, 2015. "Who gained from the introduction of free universal secondary education in England and Wales?," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2015-02, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation

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