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Returns to Elite Higher Education in the Marriage Market: Evidence from Chile

Author

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  • Katja Maria Kaufmann
  • Matthias Messner
  • Alex Solis

Abstract

In this paper we estimate the marriage market returns to being admitted to a higher ranked (i.e. more ”elite”) university by exploiting unique features of the Chilean university admission system.This system centrally allocates applicants based on their university entrance test score, which allows us to identify causal effects by using a regression discontinuity approach. Moreover, the Chilean context provides us with the necessary data on the long run outcome ‘partner quality’. We find that being admitted to a higher ranked university has substantial returns in terms of partner quality for women, while estimates for men are about half the size and not significantly different from zero. JEL-Classification: I23, I24, J12. Keywords: Returns to education quality, higher education, marriage market, regression discontinuity, Chile.

Suggested Citation

  • Katja Maria Kaufmann & Matthias Messner & Alex Solis, 2013. "Returns to Elite Higher Education in the Marriage Market: Evidence from Chile," Working Papers 489, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:igi:igierp:489
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pestel, Nico, 2016. "Searching on the Campus? Marriage Market Effects of the Student Gender Composition by Field of Study," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145510, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Massimo Anelli, 2016. "The Returns to Elite College Education: A Quasi-Experimental Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 6076, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:60:y:2017:i:c:p:36-53 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Lars Kirkebøen & Edwin Leuven & Magne Mogstad, 2014. "Field of Study, Earnings, and Self-Selection," NBER Working Papers 20816, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Alena Bicakova & Stepan Jurajda, 2016. "Field-of-Study Homogamy," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp561, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    6. W. Bentley MacLeod & Evan Riehl & Juan E. Saavedra & Miguel Urquiola, 2017. "The Big Sort: College Reputation and Labor Market Outcomes," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 223-261, July.
    7. Milla, Joniada, 2017. "The Context-Bound University Selectivity Premium," IZA Discussion Papers 11025, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Gerardino, Maria Paula & Litschig, Stephan & Pomeranz, Dina, 2017. "Can Audits Backfire? Evidence from Public Procurement in Chile," CEPR Discussion Papers 12529, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Avitabile,Ciro & De Hoyos Navarro,Rafael E., 2015. "The Heterogeneous effect of information on student performance : evidence from a randomized control trial in Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7422, The World Bank.
    10. Caroline Hoxby & Sarah Turner, "undated". "Expanding College Opportunities for High-Achieving, Low Income Students," Discussion Papers 12-014, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    11. Joshua Goodman & Michael Hurwitz & Jonathan Smith, "undated". "Access to Four-Year Public Colleges and Degree Completion," Working Paper 175226, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    12. Mansour, Hani & McKinnish, Terra, 2014. "Same-Occupation Spouses: Preferences and Search Costs," IZA Discussion Papers 8370, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Persson, Petra, 2015. "Social insurance and the marriage market," Working Paper Series 2015:6, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    14. Seth D. Zimmerman, 2016. "Making the One Percent: The Role of Elite Universities and Elite Peers," NBER Working Papers 22900, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Goodman, Joshua & Hurwitz, Michael & Smith, Jonathan, 2015. "College Access, Initial College Choice and Degree Completion," Working Paper Series rwp14-030, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    16. Jean-Marie Baland & Roberta Ziparo, 2017. "Intra-household bargaining in poor countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 108, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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