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Do Public Colleges in Developing Countries Provide Better Education than Private ones? Evidence from General Education Sector in India

  • Sheetal Sekhri

    ()

  • Yona Rubinstein

    ()

College educational outcomes of students graduating from public colleges in many developing countries are better than those graduating from private colleges. This is attributed to better quality of education provided. However, public colleges are subsidized suggesting that the observed gap might reflect pre-determined differences among students sorting into public colleges. We evaluate the impact of public colleges using a unique dataset that links admission records to college educational outcomes in India. We exploit the features of admission rules in a Regression-Discontinuity-Design, and find that the public colleges have no added value in the neighborhood of the admission cutoff scores. Controlling for entry scores, we find no differences between the exit exam outcomes of students graduating from public and private colleges..

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File URL: http://www.virginia.edu/economics/RePEc/vir/virpap/papers/virpap375.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Virginia, Department of Economics in its series Virginia Economics Online Papers with number 375.

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Length: 60 pages
Date of creation:
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Handle: RePEc:vir:virpap:375
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.virginia.edu/economics/home.html

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  1. W. Bentley MacLeod & Miguel Urquiola, 2009. "Anti-Lemons: School Reputation and Educational Quality," NBER Working Papers 15112, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Epple, Dennis & Romano, Richard E, 1998. "Competition between Private and Public Schools, Vouchers, and Peer-Group Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 33-62, March.
  3. Imbens, Guido W. & Lemieux, Thomas, 2008. "Regression discontinuity designs: A guide to practice," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 615-635, February.
  4. Guido Imbens & Karthik Kalyanaraman, 2009. "Optimal Bandwidth Choice for the Regression Discontinuity Estimator," NBER Working Papers 14726, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. McCrary, Justin, 2008. "Manipulation of the running variable in the regression discontinuity design: A density test," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 698-714, February.
  6. Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & Michael Kremer, 2011. "Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1739-74, August.
  7. Nazmul Chaudhury & Jeffrey Hammer & Michael Kremer & Karthik Muralidharan & F. Halsey Rogers, 2006. "Missing in Action: Teacher and Health Worker Absence in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 91-116, Winter.
  8. Lee, David S., 2008. "Randomized experiments from non-random selection in U.S. House elections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 675-697, February.
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