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The excess demand for subsidized child care in Germany

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  • Katharina Wrohlich

Abstract

The extension of publicly provided or subsidized child care is currently one of the priorities of the political agenda in many European countries. In this article, the excess demand for subsidized child care slots in Germany is estimated using a partial observability model. The results show that there is considerable excess demand for child care for children aged less than 3 years in East and West Germany, even among children with working mothers.

Suggested Citation

  • Katharina Wrohlich, 2008. "The excess demand for subsidized child care in Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(10), pages 1217-1228.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:40:y:2008:i:10:p:1217-1228
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840600771288
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alois Stutzer & Reto Dursteler, 2005. "Versagen in der staatlichen Krippenförderung ? Betreuungsgutscheine als Alternative," CREMA Working Paper Series 2005-26, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    2. Michael Lokshin, 2004. "Household Childcare Choices and Women’s Work Behavior in Russia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
    3. Ch. LAUER & A.M. WEBER, 2003. "Employment of Mothers after Childbirth : A French-German Comparison," Working Papers ERMES 0309, ERMES, University Paris 2.
    4. Tom Kornstad & Thor Thoresen, 2007. "A discrete choice model for labor supply and childcare," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(4), pages 781-803, October.
    5. Katharina Wrohlich, 2004. "Child Care Costs and Mothers' Labor Supply: An Empirical Analysis for Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 412, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    6. John M. Abowd & Henry S. Farber, 1982. "Job Queues and the Union Status of Workers," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 35(3), pages 354-367, April.
    7. Del Boca, Daniela & Locatelli, Marilena & Vuri, Daniela, 2004. "Child Care Choices by Italian Households," IZA Discussion Papers 983, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Bridget G. Hiedemann & Jutta M. Joesch, 2002. "The demand for nonrelative child care among families with infants and toddlers: A double-hurdle approach," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(3), pages 495-526.
    9. Poirier, Dale J., 1980. "Partial observability in bivariate probit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 209-217, February.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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