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The Role of Economic Incentives and Attitudes in Participation and Childcare Decisions

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  • Edwin van Gameren

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Abstract

We analyzed the participation and childcare decisions made by mothers in two-parent households with children aged 0–12 in the Netherlands, paying special attention to the role of attitudes regarding work and care. In a multinomial logit model we distinguished between not working, a small part-time job, and a larger job. For working mothers we considered no childcare, informal, and formal childcare. We accounted for potential endogeneity of attitudes. The results showed that the role of the price of formal childcare in the decision-making process was negligible. A higher earnings capacity increased the take-up of larger jobs and formal childcare. Modern attitudes had a strong impact on the decisions to work and to use childcare. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

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  • Edwin van Gameren, 2013. "The Role of Economic Incentives and Attitudes in Participation and Childcare Decisions," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 296-313, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:34:y:2013:i:3:p:296-313
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-012-9332-1
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    Cited by:

    1. María Davia & Nuria Legazpe, 2014. "Determinants of Employment Decisions After the First Child Birth in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 214-227, June.
    2. Marshall Medoff, 2015. "The Impact of Antiabortion Criminal Activities and State Abortion Policies on Abortion Providers in the United States," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 570-580, December.
    3. Mine Hancioglu & Bastian Hartmann, 2014. "What Makes Single Mothers Expand or Reduce Employment?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 27-39, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor force participation; Childcare use; Attitudes; Multinomial logit;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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