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Part-time versus full-time work and child care costs: evidence for married mothers

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  • Lisa Powell

Abstract

This paper contributes to the analysis of female labour supply by accounting for both child care costs and differences in part-time and full-time work. An ordered probit model is used to examine the impact of child care costs on the work status of married mothers. Data are drawn from the Canadian National Child Care Survey and the Labour Market Activity Survey. The results from this paper show the degree to which child care subsidies may have differential impacts on part-time and full-time work decisions by mothers: the child care cost elasticities for part-time and full-time employment are reported to be -0.21 and -0.71, respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Lisa Powell, 1998. "Part-time versus full-time work and child care costs: evidence for married mothers," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(4), pages 503-511.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:4:p:503-511
    DOI: 10.1080/000368498325769
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Susan L. Averett & H. Elizabeth Peters & Donald M. Waldman, 1997. "Tax Credits, Labor Supply, And Child Care," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(1), pages 125-135, February.
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