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The role of economic incentives and attitudes in participation and childcare decisions

  • Edwin van Gameren

    ()

    (El Colegio de México)

We analyze the participation and childcare decisions made by mothers in two-parent households with children aged 0-12 in the Netherlands, paying special attention to the role of attitudes regarding work and care. In a multinomial logit model we distinguish between not working, a small parttime job, and a larger job. For working mothers we consider no childcare, informal, and formal childcare. We account for potential endogeneity of attitudes. The results show that the role of the price of formal childcare in the decision-making process is negligible. A higher earnings capacity increases the take-up of larger jobs and formal childcare. Modern attitudes have a strong impact on the decisions to work and to use childcare.

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File URL: http://cee.colmex.mx/documentos/documentos-de-trabajo/2010/dt20105.pdf
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Paper provided by El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos in its series Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos with number 2010-05.

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Date of creation: Sep 2010
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Handle: RePEc:emx:ceedoc:2010-05
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.colmex.mx/centros/cee/

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