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Changing Trends of Mothers’ Active and Passive Childcare Times

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  • Ana Moro-Egido

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  • Ana Moro-Egido, 2012. "Changing Trends of Mothers’ Active and Passive Childcare Times," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 11-23, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:33:y:2012:i:1:p:11-23
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-011-9265-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ann Berry & Mary Katras & Yoshie Sano & Jaerim Lee & Jean Bauer, 2008. "Job Volatility of Rural, Low-income Mothers: A Mixed Methods Approach," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 5-22, March.
    2. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1998. "Life Cycle Schooling and Dynamic Selection Bias: Models and Evidence for Five Cohorts of American Males," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(2), pages 262-333, April.
    3. Robert Weagley & Min-Lee Chan & Jiahui Yan, 2007. "Married Couples’ Time Allocation Decisions and Marital Stability," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 507-525, September.
    4. Daniel Hallberg & Anders Klevmarken, 2003. "Time for children: A study of parent's time allocation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(2), pages 205-226, May.
    5. Raquel Bernal & Michael P. Keane, 2011. "Child Care Choices and Children's Cognitive Achievement: The Case of Single Mothers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(3), pages 459-512.
    6. David Maume, 2011. "Reconsidering the Temporal Increase in Fathers’ Time with Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 411-423, September.
    7. Daniel Miller, 2011. "Maternal Work and Child Overweight and Obesity: The Importance of Timing," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 204-218, June.
    8. Klevmarken, N. Anders & Stafford, Frank P., 1997. "Time Diary Measures of Investment in Young Children," Working Paper Series 1997:8, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    9. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Nezih Guner & John Knowles, 2002. "Why Do Women Wait? Matching, Wage Inequality, and the Incentives for Fertility Delay," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(4), pages 815-855, October.
    10. Charlene Kalenkoski & David Ribar & Leslie Stratton, 2009. "The influence of wages on parents’ allocations of time to child care and market work in the United Kingdom," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(2), pages 399-419, April.
    11. Raquel Bernal, 2008. "The Effect Of Maternal Employment And Child Care On Children'S Cognitive Development," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 49(4), pages 1173-1209, November.
    12. Ana I. Moro-Egido, 2005. "Changes in quantity and quality of time for children: United States, 1981-1997," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2005/18, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    13. Berenice Monna & Anne Gauthier, 2008. "A Review of the Literature on the Social and Economic Determinants of Parental Time," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 634-653, December.
    14. Kooreman, Peter & Kapteyn, Arie, 1987. "A Disaggregated Analysis of the Allocation of Time within the Household," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(2), pages 223-249, April.
    15. Keane, Michael P & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1997. "The Career Decisions of Young Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(3), pages 473-522, June.
    16. Charlene Kalenkoski & David Ribar & Leslie Stratton, 2007. "The effect of family structure on parents’ child care time in the United States and the United Kingdom," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 353-384, December.
    17. Cristina Borra & Luis Palma, 2009. "Child Care Choices in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 323-338, December.
    18. Wen You & George Davis, 2011. "Childhood Overweight: Does Quality of Parental Childcare Time Matter?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 219-232, June.
    19. Nicole Forry, 2009. "The Impact of Child Care Subsidies on Low-Income Single Parents: An Examination of Child Care Expenditures and Family Finances," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 43-54, March.
    20. Charlene Kalenkoski & Gigi Foster, 2008. "The quality of time spent with children in Australian households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 243-266, September.
    21. Charlene M. Kalenkoski & David C. Ribar & Leslie S. Stratton, 2005. "Parental Child Care in Single-Parent, Cohabiting, and Married-Couple Families: Time-Diary Evidence from the United Kingdom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 194-198, May.
    22. Lyn Craig, 2007. "How Employed Mothers in Australia Find Time for Both Market Work and Childcare," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 69-87, March.
    23. Andres Erosa & Luisa Fuster & Diego Restuccia, 2002. "Fertility Decisions and Gender Differences in Labor Turnover, Employment, and Wages," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(4), pages 856-891, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barry Chiswick & Donka Mirtcheva, 2013. "Religion and Child Health: Religious Affiliation, Importance, and Attendance and Health Status among American Youth," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 120-140, March.
    2. Luis Gamboa & Blanca Zuluaga, 2013. "Is There a Motherhood Penalty? Decomposing the Family Wage Gap in Colombia," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 421-434, December.
    3. Daniel Kuehn, 2016. "Home Production, House Values, and the Great Recession," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 99-114, March.
    4. Ragnhild Nes & Lars Hauge & Tom Kornstad & Petter Kristensen & Markus Landolt & Leif Eskedal & Lorentz Irgens & Margarete Vollrath, 2014. "The Impact of Child Behaviour Problems on Maternal Employment: A Longitudinal Cohort Study," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 351-361, September.
    5. Daphne Pedersen & Gabe Kilzer, 2014. "Work-to-Family Conflict and the Maternal Gatekeeping of Dual-Earner Mothers with Young Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 251-262, June.
    6. Edwin van Gameren, 2013. "The Role of Economic Incentives and Attitudes in Participation and Childcare Decisions," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 296-313, September.
    7. Shu-Hsi Ho & Wen-Shai Hung, 2013. "A study of the Health of Children Born to Foreign- and Native-Born Mothers in Taiwan," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 355-368, September.
    8. Melissa Stacer & Robert Perrucci, 2013. "Parental Involvement with Children at School, Home, and Community," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 340-354, September.
    9. Christian Nsiah & Ron DeBeaumont & Annette Ryerson, 2013. "Motherhood and Earnings: Wage Variability by Major Occupational Category and Earnings Level," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 224-234, June.
    10. Haeil Jung & Chaeyoung Chang, 2016. "Is Mothers’ Work Related to Childhood Weight Changes in the United States?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 581-593, December.
    11. Nora Reich, 2014. "Fathers’ Childcare: The Differences Between Participation and Amount of Time," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 190-213, June.

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