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A study of the Health of Children Born to Foreign- and Native-Born Mothers in Taiwan

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  • Shu-Hsi Ho

    ()

  • Wen-Shai Hung

    ()

Abstract

This paper examined the health of children born to foreign-born and native-born mothers. Using a logistic methodology to analyze data from the 2008 Survey of Foreign and Mainland Chinese Spouses’ Living Demand and the 2005 National Health Survey of Children 12 Years old and under in Taiwan, the results showed girls were more likely to have better health than boys regardless of whether they were born to migrant or native-born mothers. In addition, a more significant effect was found for native-born fathers than foreign-born mothers on children’s health among transnational marriage families. Finally, household income might have a more significant impact on children’s health in native-born mothers’ families than those of foreign-born mothers. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Shu-Hsi Ho & Wen-Shai Hung, 2013. "A study of the Health of Children Born to Foreign- and Native-Born Mothers in Taiwan," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 355-368, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:34:y:2013:i:3:p:355-368
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-012-9336-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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