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Family income and child health in China

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  • Goode, Alison
  • Mavromaras, Kostas
  • zhu, Rong

Abstract

We examine the effect of family income on child health using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey. We find a significant child health/family income gradient for the overall sample of Chinese children. Our preferred specification shows that the income gradient increases with child age until the age of 12. We find that parental health consciousness, household sanitation conditions and nutrition intake are the channels through which family income affects child health. After controlling for these transmission channels, the gradient strengthens with child age until the age of 17. We find that children from poorer families in China are not only more likely to experience several types of chronic illnesses, but also less likely to address effectively some health conditions. The income gradient is found to be very heterogeneous, with greater effect on children with poorer health, girls and children in rural China.

Suggested Citation

  • Goode, Alison & Mavromaras, Kostas & zhu, Rong, 2014. "Family income and child health in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 152-165.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:29:y:2014:i:c:p:152-165
    DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2014.04.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bakkeli, Nan Zou, 2016. "Income inequality and health in China: A panel data analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 39-47.
    2. Qin, Xuezheng & Wang, Tianyu & Zhuang, Castiel Chen, 2016. "Intergenerational transfer of human capital and its impact on income mobility: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 306-321.
    3. Qi, Di & Wu, Yichao, 2016. "The extent and risk factors of child poverty in urban China — What can be done for realising the Chinese government goal of eradicating poverty before 2020," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 74-82.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child health; Income gradient; China;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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