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Why is son preference so persistent in East and South Asia? a cross-country study of China, India, and the Republic of Korea

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Listed:
  • Das Gupta, Monica
  • Jiang Zhenghua
  • Li Bohua
  • Xie Zhenming
  • Woojin Chung
  • Bae Hwa-Ok

Abstract

Son preference has persisted in the face of sweeping economic and social changes in China, India, and the Republic of Korea. The authors attribute this to their similar family systems, which generate strong disincentives to raise daughters while valuing adult women's contributions to the household. Urbanization, female education, and employment can only slowly change these incentives without more direct efforts by the state and civil society to increase the flexibility of the kinship system such that daughters and sons can be perceived as being more equally valuable. Much can be done to this end through social movements, legislation, and the mass media.

Suggested Citation

  • Das Gupta, Monica & Jiang Zhenghua & Li Bohua & Xie Zhenming & Woojin Chung & Bae Hwa-Ok, 2002. "Why is son preference so persistent in East and South Asia? a cross-country study of China, India, and the Republic of Korea," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2942, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:2942
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Das Gupta, Monica & Sunhwa Lee & Uberoi, Patricia & Danning Wang & Lihong Wang & Xiaodan Zhang, 2000. "State policies and women's autonomy in China, India, and the Republic of Korea, 1950-2000 : lessons from contrasting experiences," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2497, The World Bank.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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