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The quality–quantity trade-off: evidence from the relaxation of China’s one-child policy

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  • Haoming Liu

Abstract

This paper uses the exogenous variation in fertility introduced by China’s family planning policies to identify the impact of child quantity on child quality. We find that the number of children has a significant negative effect on child height, which supports the quality–quantity trade-off theory. Our instrumental quantile regression approach shows that the impact varies considerably across the height distribution, particularly for boys. However, the trade-off is much weaker if quality is measured by educational attainments, suggesting that the measurement of child quality is also crucial in testing the quality–quantity trade-off theory. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

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  • Haoming Liu, 2014. "The quality–quantity trade-off: evidence from the relaxation of China’s one-child policy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 565-602, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:27:y:2014:i:2:p:565-602
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-013-0478-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Fertility; Quantile regression; Quality–quantity trade-off; J13;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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