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Socioeconomic status and health: Do gradients differ within childhood and adolescence?

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  • Chen, Edith
  • Martin, Andrew D.
  • Matthews, Karen A.

Abstract

Socioeconomic status (SES) gradients may not be static across the lifespan, but instead may vary in strength across different life stages. This study examined the periods in childhood when SES and health relationships emerge and are strongest among US children. Data came from the National Health Interview Survey, 1994, a cross sectional, nationally representative sample of 33,911 US children ages 0-18. Parents were asked about family SES and child health status. Global health measures included overall ratings of child health, activity and school limitations. Acute conditions included childhood injuries and respiratory illnesses. For all global child health measures, lower family SES was associated with poorer child health in a gradient fashion (P

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Edith & Martin, Andrew D. & Matthews, Karen A., 2006. "Socioeconomic status and health: Do gradients differ within childhood and adolescence?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(9), pages 2161-2170, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:62:y:2006:i:9:p:2161-2170
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