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A Review of the Literature on the Social and Economic Determinants of Parental Time

  • Berenice Monna


  • Anne Gauthier


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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Family and Economic Issues.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 634-653

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:29:y:2008:i:4:p:634-653
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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

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    1. Cara B. Fedick & Shelley Pacholok & Anne H. Gauthier, 2005. "Methodological issues in the estimation of parental time – Analysis of measures in a Canadian time-use survey," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 2(1), pages 67-87, October.
    2. Connelly, Rachel & Kimmel, Jean, 2007. "The Role of Nonstandard Work Hours in Maternal Caregiving for Young Children," IZA Discussion Papers 3093, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Benoît Rapoport & Céline Bourdais, 2008. "Parental time and working schedules," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 903-932, October.
    4. Ted Bergstrom, 1994. "A Survey of Theories of the Family," Labor and Demography 9401001, EconWPA, revised 10 Oct 1994.
    5. C. Russell Hill & Frank P. Stafford, 1980. "Parental Care of Children: Time Diary Estimates of Quantity, Predictability, and Variety," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 15(2), pages 219-239.
    6. Lyn Craig, 2007. "How Employed Mothers in Australia Find Time for Both Market Work and Childcare," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 69-87, March.
    7. Nancy Folbre & Jayoung Yoon & Kade Finnoff & Allison Sidle Fuligni, 2004. "By What Measure? Family Time Devoted to Children in the U.S," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2004-06, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    8. Robert Drago, 2001. "Time on the Job and Time with Their Kids: Cultures of Teaching and Parenthood in the US," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 1-31.
    9. Charlene Kalenkoski & David Ribar & Leslie Stratton, 2007. "The effect of family structure on parents’ child care time in the United States and the United Kingdom," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 353-384, December.
    10. Nancy Folbre & Jayoung Yoon, 2007. "What is child care? Lessons from time-use surveys of major English-speaking countries," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 223-248, September.
    11. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles, 2000. "Women's Time Allocation to Child Care: Determinants and Consequences," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(1), pages 1-24, March.
    12. Michael Bittman, 1999. "Parenthood Without Penalty: Time Use And Public Policy In Australia And Finland," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 27-42.
    13. Enilda Delgado & Maria Canabal, 2006. "Factors Associated with Negative Spillover from Job to Home Among Latinos in the United States," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 92-112, April.
    14. Daniel Hallberg & Anders Klevmarken, 2003. "Time for children: A study of parent's time allocation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 205-226, 05.
    15. Charlene Kalenkoski & Gigi Foster, 2008. "The quality of time spent with children in Australian households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 243-266, September.
    16. Lonnie Golden, 2008. "Limited Access: Disparities in Flexible Work Schedules and Work-at-home," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 86-109, March.
    17. Evelyn Lehrer & Seiichi Kawasaki, 1985. "Child care arrangements and fertility: An analysis of two-earner households," Demography, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 499-513, November.
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