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How Does the Presence of Children Affect Dependent Care? A Psycho-Economic Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio

    () (University of Zaragoza)

  • Marcén, Miriam

    () (University of Zaragoza)

  • Molina, José Alberto

    () (University of Zaragoza)

Abstract

This paper adopts a psycho-economic approach, based on the "Demonstration Effect" hypothesis, to analyze the effects that the presence of children has on the time devoted to elder care. We combine the approach of the Social Cognitive Theory and a three-generation altruism model. Using the 2003 Spanish Time Use Survey (STUS), we confirm the "Demonstration Effect", i.e, the presence of children, while parents are engaged in elder care activities, increases by 11.63% the time devoted to these activities. Additionally, we find that time devoted to child care as primary activity increases by 11.19 minutes per day when children are present during adult care activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Marcén, Miriam & Molina, José Alberto, 2007. "How Does the Presence of Children Affect Dependent Care? A Psycho-Economic Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 2726, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2726
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cristina Borra, 2010. "Childcare cost and Spanish mother’s labour force participation," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 194(3), pages 9-40, October.
    2. Mitrut, Andreea & Wolff, François-Charles, 2009. "A causal test of the demonstration effect theory," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 52-54, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    children; dependent care; psycho-economic approach; demonstration effect;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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