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Habits, Addictions, and Traditions

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  • Becker, G.S.

Abstract

The past casts a long shadow on the present through its influence on the formation of present preferences. The past influences present preferences through habitual, addictive, and traditional behavior, and in other ways. These have profound implications for the analysis of economic and social phenomena, including short and long run changes in the amount of smoking due to higher taxes on a pack of cigarettes, and the effects of taxes on effort and work habits in the long run. The link between the past and present choice may also explain why and how parents influence the formation of children's preferences, and the formation and support of institutions and culture. Copyright 1992 by WWZ and Helbing & Lichtenhahn Verlag AG
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Suggested Citation

  • Becker, G.S., 1991. "Habits, Addictions, and Traditions," University of Chicago - Economics Research Center 91-8, Chicago - Economics Research Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:chicer:91-8
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    Cited by:

    1. David Schmeidler & Itzhak Gilboa, 1994. "Reaction to Price Changes and Aspiration Level Adjustments," Working Papers 023, Ohio State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Kverndokk, Snorre & Figenbaum, Erik & Hovi, Jon, 2020. "Would my driving pattern change if my neighbor were to buy an emission-free car?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).
    3. Shouyu Yao & Zhuoqun Wang & Mengyue Sun & Jing Liao & Feiyang Cheng, 2020. "Top executives’ early‐life experience and financial disclosure quality: impact from the Great Chinese Famine," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 60(5), pages 4757-4793, December.
    4. Donald Cox & Oded Stark, 1993. "Intergenerational Transfers And Demonstration Effect," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 244, Boston College Department of Economics.
    5. Croix, David de la & Michel, Philippe, 1999. "Optimal growth when tastes are inherited," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 519-537, February.
    6. Manel Baucells & Lin Zhao, 2020. "Everything in Moderation: Foundations and Applications of the Satiation Model," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 66(12), pages 5701-5719, December.
    7. Hui Xiong & Ying‐Ju Chen, 2016. "Nonlinear pricing with consumer satiation," Naval Research Logistics (NRL), John Wiley & Sons, vol. 63(5), pages 386-400, August.
    8. Vriend, Nicolaas J., 1996. "Rational behavior and economic theory," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 263-285, March.
    9. Bélyácz, Iván & Kovács, Kármen, 2021. "Az egyén kognitív korlátaitól viselkedésének előrejelezhetőségéig [From the cognitive boundaries of individuals to the predictability of their behaviour]," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 132-149.
    10. Strulik, Holger, 2020. "Opioid epidemics," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 37(C).
    11. Dr Ronald W. McQuaid, 1996. "Lifelong Learning And Local Economic Development," Working Paper p22, Departement of Economics, Napier University.
    12. de la Croix, David & Michel, Philippe, 1997. "Altruism and self-refrain," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 1998010, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES), revised 00 Apr 1998.

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