IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Resource Transfers to the Elderly: Do Adult Children Substitute Financial Transfers for Time Transfers?

Using the Health and Retirement Study, this research investigates whether an adult child substitutes financial transfers to an elderly parent for time transfers as the cost of his or her time increases. The author develops and estimates a model of the effect of a child's wage rate on time and money transferred to an elderly parent. She then calculates a wage elasticity and studies how this varies with the existence of substitutes such as siblings and a spouse, and how this varies by sex of the child. The results show that an adult child will substitute money for time. Furthermore, the author finds that for a male child, a spouse is a substitute helper for elderly parents and that for a female child a spouse is a complementary helper while siblings serve as substitutes.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/drafts/2008/DRU2542.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by RAND Corporation Publications Department in its series Working Papers with number 01-05.

as
in new window

Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:01-05
Contact details of provider: Postal: 1776 Main Street, P.O. Box 2138, Santa Monica, California 90407-2138
Phone: 310-393-0411
Fax: 310-393-4818
Web page: http://www.rand.org/pubs/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Schoeni, R.F. & Freedman, V.A. & Wallace, R.B., 2000. "Persistent, Consistent, and Widespread?: Another Look at Recent Trends in Old-Age Disability," Papers 00-13, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
  2. Donald Cox & Zekeriya Eser & Emmanuel Jimenez, 1996. "Motives for Private Transfers over the Life Cycle: An Analytical Framework and Evidence for Peru," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 327., Boston College Department of Economics.
  3. Bernheim, B Douglas & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H, 1985. "The Strategic Bequest Motive," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(6), pages 1045-76, December.
  4. Joseph G. Altonji & Fumio Hayashi & Laurence Kotlikoff, 1995. "Parental Altruism and Inter Vivos Transfers: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 5378, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Hurd, Michael D, 1990. "Research on the Elderly: Economic Status, Retirement, and Consumption and Saving," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 28(2), pages 565-637, June.
  6. Joseph G. Altonji & Fumio Hayashi & Laurence Kotlikoff, 1996. "The Effects of Income and Wealth on Time and Money Transfers between Parents and Children," NBER Working Papers 5522, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Wales, Terence J & Woodland, A D, 1977. "Estimation of the Allocation of Time for Work, Leisure, and Housework," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(1), pages 115-32, January.
  8. Schoeni, R-F, 1996. "Does Aid to Families with Dependent Children Displace Familial Assistance?," Papers 96-12, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
  9. Altonji, Joseph G & Hayashi, Fumio & Kotlikoff, Laurence J, 1992. "Is the Extended Family Altruistically Linked? Direct Tests Using Micro Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1177-98, December.
  10. Joseph G. Altonji & Hidehiko Ichimura & Taisuke Otsu, 2008. "Estimating Derivatives in Nonseparable Models with Limited Dependent Variables," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-574, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  11. Steven Stern & Bridget Hiedemann, 1999. "Strategic Play Among Family Members When Making Long-Term Care Decisions," Virginia Economics Online Papers 321, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
  12. McGarry, K. & Schoeni, R.F., 1995. "Transfer Behavior With the Family: Results from the Asset and Health Dynamics Survey," Papers 95-09, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
  13. Tennille J. Checkovich & Steven Stern, 2002. "Shared Caregiving Responsibilities of Adult Siblings with Elderly Parents," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(3), pages 441-478.
  14. Kooreman, P. & Kapteyn, A.J., 1984. "A disaggregated analysis of the allocation of time within the household," Research Memorandum FEW 153, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  15. Steven Stern, 1995. "Estimating Family Long-Term Care Decisions in the Presence of Endogenous Child Characteristics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 551-580.
  16. Cox, Donald & Rank, Mark R, 1992. "Inter-vivos Transfers and Intergenerational Exchange," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(2), pages 305-14, May.
  17. Pezzin, Liliana E & Schone, Barbara Steinberg, 1997. "The Allocation of Resources in Intergenerational Households: Adult Children and Their Elderly Parents," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 460-64, May.
  18. Cox, Donald, 1987. "Motives for Private Income Transfers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(3), pages 508-46, June.
  19. Lam, D. & Schoeni, R.F., 1993. "Private Interhousehold Transfers of Money and Time: New Empirical Evidence," Papers 93-26, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
  20. Becker, Gary S, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1063-93, Nov.-Dec..
  21. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & John N. Morris, 1990. "Why Don't the Elderly Live with Their Children? A New Look," NBER Chapters, in: Issues in the Economics of Aging, pages 149-172 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  22. Lee Lillard & Robert Willis, 1997. "Motives for interqenerational transfers: Evidence from Malaysia," Demography, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 115-134, February.
  23. Andreoni, James, 1989. "Giving with Impure Altruism: Applications to Charity and Ricardian Equivalence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1447-58, December.
  24. Robert Schoeni, 1998. "Reassessing the decline in parent-child old-age coresidence during the twentieth century," Demography, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 307-313, August.
  25. Heckman, James J, 1990. "Varieties of Selection Bias," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 313-18, May.
  26. Kenneth Couch & Mary Daly & Douglas Wolf, 1999. "Time? money? both? the allocation of resources to older Parents," Demography, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 219-232, May.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:01-05. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Benson Wong)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.