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Stressed Out on Four Continents: Time Crunch or Yuppie Kvetch?

Author

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  • Daniel S. Hamermesh

    (Edward Everett Hale Centennial professor of economics, University of Texas at Austin, research associate, National Bureau of Economic Research, and program director, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA))

  • Jungmin Lee

    (Assistant professor, University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, and research affiliate, IZA)

Abstract

Social commentators have pointed to problems of workers who face "time stress"-an absence of sufficient time to accomplish all their tasks. An economic theory views time stress as reflecting how tightly the time constraint binds households. Time stress will be more prevalent in households with higher full earnings and whose members work longer in the market or on "required" homework. Evidence from Australia (2001), Germany (2002), the United States (2003), and Korea (1999) corroborates the theory. Adults in households with higher earnings perceive more time stress for the same amount of time spent in market work and household work. The importance of higher full earnings in generating time stress is not small, particularly in the United States-much is "yuppie kvetch." Copyright by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel S. Hamermesh & Jungmin Lee, 2007. "Stressed Out on Four Continents: Time Crunch or Yuppie Kvetch?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(2), pages 374-383, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:89:y:2007:i:2:p:374-383
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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