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Health inequality and the uses of time for workers in Europe: policy implications

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  • J. Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal

    () (University of Zaragoza and CTUR
    CTUR, University of Oxford)

  • Jose Alberto Molina

    () (University of Zaragoza and CTUR
    IZA)

Abstract

Abstract This paper analyses the relationship between health inequality and the time allocation decisions of workers in six European countries, deriving some important policy implications in the context of income tax systems, regulation of working conditions, and taxes on leisure activities. Using the Multinational Time Use Study, we find that a better perception of own health is associated with more time devoted to market work activities in all six countries and with less time devoted to housework activities for both men and women. However, the evidence for the associations between health and leisure is mixed. This study represents a first step in understanding cross-country differences in the relationship between health status and time devoted to a range of activities for workers, in contrast with other analyses that have mainly focused only on market work. A better understanding of these cross-country differences may help to identify the effects of public policy on inequalities in the uses of time. JEL codes: D13, J16, J22

Suggested Citation

  • J. Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Alberto Molina, 2016. "Health inequality and the uses of time for workers in Europe: policy implications," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izaels:v:5:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1186_s40174-016-0055-4
    DOI: 10.1186/s40174-016-0055-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. García, Lucia, 2018. "El mercado laboral en España desde la oferta: evolución reciente nacional y regional
      [Supply labour market in Spain: recent evolution at a national and regional level]
      ," MPRA Paper 85262, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Molina, Jose Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2016. "La innovación como determinante pare el emprendimiento
      [Innovation as determinant of entrepreneurship]
      ," MPRA Paper 71471, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health; Time allocation; Inequality; Multinational time use study;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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