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Evolution of social inequalities in health in Quebec?

Author

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  • Batana, Yélé Maweki

Abstract

This paper, based on data from the National Population Health Surveys (NPHS) from 1994 to 2007, analyzes the evolution of social inequalities in health in Quebec since the mid-1990s using two health measures namely self-assessed health (SAH) and health utility index (HUI). Two methods are used. The first is based on concentration indices and their decompositions while the second is based on the income-health matrices. The results confirm the existence of persistent health gradients, but with some variations over time. The findings also suggest an increase, on average, in health inequalities during the period with a peak during the years 2002/2003. These variations appear especially stronger for low-income individuals.

Suggested Citation

  • Batana, Yélé Maweki, 2010. "Evolution of social inequalities in health in Quebec?," MPRA Paper 20710, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:20710
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/20710/1/MPRA_paper_20710.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina, 2016. "Health inequality and the uses of time for workers in Europe: policy implications," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
    2. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2015. "Health inequality and the use of time for workers in Europe," MPRA Paper 65334, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Concentration indices; decomposition analysis; self-assessed health; health utility index; income-health matrices; dominance analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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