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Income-related reporting heterogeneity in self-assessed health: evidence from France

  • Fabrice Etilé

    (INRA - CORELA, HEDG and PSE (CNRS-EHESS-ENPC-ENS))

  • Carine Milcent

    (INRA - CORELA, HEDG and PSE (CNRS-EHESS-ENPC-ENS))

This paper tests for income-related reporting heterogeneity in self-assessed health (SAH). It also constructs a synthetic measure of clinical health to decompose the effect of income on SAH into an effect on clinical health (which is called a health production effect) and a reporting heterogeneity effect. We find health production effects essentially for low-income individuals, and reporting heterogeneity for the choice between the medium labels, i.e. 'fair' vs 'good' and for high-income individuals. As such, SAH should be used cautiously for the assessment of income-related health inequalities in France. It is however possible to minimize the reporting heterogeneity bias by converting SAH into a binary variable for poor health vs other health statuses. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1164
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 15 (2006)
Issue (Month): 9 ()
Pages: 965-981

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:15:y:2006:i:9:p:965-981
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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