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Can income inequality contribute to understand inequalities in health? An empirical approach based on the European Community Household Panel

  • David Cantarero

    ()

  • Marta Pascual

    ()

  • Jose Maria Sarabia

    ()

In this paper the causal effects of socioeconomic status, in particular income, on individuals health in the European Union are analysed. We focus on the relationship between income and health. Finally, an international comparison of concentration indices for socioeconomic inequality in health based on the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) is presented. This survey contains data on individuals and households and the information is homogeneous across European Countries. KEY WORDS: Inequality, Health, Social Capital, European Community Household Panel, Ordered probit. JEL CATEGORY: D31, D63, I10

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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa04p230.

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Date of creation: Aug 2004
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa04p230
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